How do you pronounce interosseous in English (1 out of 19).

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Translation of interosseous

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IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) of interosseous

The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is an alphabetic system of phonetic notation based primarily on the Latin alphabet. With phonetic transcriptions, dictionarie tell you about the pronunciation of words, because the spelling of an English word does not tell you how you should pronounce it. Below is the phonetic transcription of interosseous:
/ɪntɛɹ̩əsiəs/

interosseous on Youtube

  1. of the attachment of what we call the interosseous membrane. The interosseous membrane is a thick
  2. The ankle syndesmosis includes the interosseous membrane and interosseous ligament
  3. - Start washing interosseous line now.
  4. Those structures that produce joint compression include the interosseous ligaments and the
  5. and radius and interosseous membrane.
  6. So all these muscles, all five of these muscles are innervated by the posterior interosseous
  7. it attaches to the interosseous membrane in between. So it winds down the forearm and
  8. lumbricals, interosseous muscles, the palmaris brevis and the adductor pollicis. I'll just
  9. He still had the interosseous tendon holding the tibia to the fibula (hard to eat, I guess),
  10. For T1 Assess the first dorsal interosseous
  11. tissues to prevent injury to the posterior interosseous nerve
  12. posterior interosseous nerve
  13. Apart from the extensor digitorum brevis and the first two dorsal interosseous muscles,
  14. the extensor digitorum brevis muscle and the first two dorsal interosseous muscles, but
  15. the interosseous line in was
  16. the Syndesmosis is the interosseous membrane that connects the tibia with the fibula and
  17. the anterior interosseous nerve,
  18. Then continue to palpate more proximally for the interosseous ligament and membrane
  19. Tenderness on the interosseous membrane is associated with a prolonged recovery time and a more severe injury