Follow US:

Practice English Speaking&Listening with: Errors Involving Participial Phrases, Part II

(0)
Difficulty: 0

I want to talk about how one sees

problems with participial phrases that

are standing outside of the main clause

when they're separated by a comma for

the main clause because there's a set of

problems that can occur when the

participles don't modify the right thing

so when I give you a kind of test for

for checking that and maybe see how you

would go about correcting sentences with

this kind of problem in them so let's

start out with a sentence that works

seen from a distance

New York looks great so here is a

participle phrase seen from a distance

that is separated by a comma from the

main clause the main clause being New

York looks great and now what would in

this video we're looking at participial

phrases that begin with a past

participle like scene okay because the

test here that you could use to see if

everything is working correctly you can

take the subject of the main clause and

then add to that the passive voice form

of the participle in this case scene and

so if you turn that participle into a

verb into a passive voice verb and you

you can see if the sentence is working

correctly so the subject is New York New

York look so this is the subject verb

combination in this sentence as it

stands New York looks New York is the

subject so we put New York here in our

test sentence and then the passive voice

form of the participle so the participle

is seen and if we turn that into the

passive voice we get is seen something

is seen so we get New York in our test

sentence we get New York is seen from a

distance so see from a distance is our

parts of the phrase

beginning with the past participle and

to test that we can see but New York is

the subject of a test sentence and then

add the passive voice form of whatever

the past participle is so we get New

York is seen from a distance and is that

what the sentence is trying is that part

of what the sentence is saying and

indeed it is seen from a distance New

York looks great so remember that parts

of new phrases separated by a comma from

the main clause they always modify the

subject of the main clause and that's

why we can use the subject in a test

sentence to see if the parts of the

phrase is actually modifying what it's

supposed to be modifying namely the

subjects of New York is scenes from a

dissonance that would be our test

sentence to show that scene from a

distance New York looks great is a good

sentence it is correct so now let's look

at this sentence here based on false

reports the suspect was arrested

well our test would be what would our

test be here so the the subject of the

main clause is the suspect so we write

the suspect and now the participial

phrase here based on false rewards based

of course is the past participle so who

if we were to turn that into a passive

voice verb we would get the subject the

suspect is based and we go on one false

reports

the suspect is based on false reports

well people even suspects can't be based

on any kind of report a person cannot be

based on a report so this doesn't work

now I think this particular one based on

because it's so widespread and indeed in

time it may become correct but I would

say it's correct right now what what is

wanted here is something more like on

the basis of false reports that is

something that's adverbial and

prepositional phrase on the basis of

false reports the suspect was arrested

how was he arrested on the basis of

false reports that's happened that's an

adverbial function and that's what

prepositional phrases do based on false

reports is clearly a participle phrase

but it's also clearly in this sense

supposed to function as an adverb how

was he arrested based on false reports

that's how well they did I mean to my

hair that just sounds completely

incorrect because based on false reports

as a part of the phrase and parts of the

phrases are never at verbal they are

always magic titles so this in my in my

playbook this sentence is is absolutely

not something that works and we can see

that with our little little test so

let's look at this one now here is a

participle phrase that actually doesn't

begin with a participle it begins with

an adverb it's a very short participle

phrase universally revered sand ores

acclaim thrills millions now we see here

the same thing if we if we

do our little test here the subject is

sand or the Clank

so I'll put essence say from essence a

claim S is a claim now here's our

participle phrase I can just put is

revered and mean to be fine to put

universally if I put it up here running

out of room here so now what we get in

our test sentence is sand or is a claim

is universally revered well that's

obviously not what the intention of this

speaker is it's it's sand or himself who

is universally revered not as a claim

you can't Revere some well you can't

revere somebody's a claim you Revere the

person so here this there's been an

unintentional meaning here namely that

that sand ores a claim is universally

revered whereas the speaker certainly

wanted to say that sand or himself is

universally revered so it should be

something like the universally revered

sand or has achieved a status that

thrills millions or something or sand or

has achieved a claim that thrills

millions or sometime but it has to be

sadler because then we get sand or is

universally revered rather than sand or

as a claim is universally we're here so

these are common problems with parts of

the phrases that stand outside of the

main clause that are separated from the

main clause set off by commas or by a

comma and if that participial phrase is

a is one that contains a past participle

then again this test is the subject of

the main clause because that's what the

participle phrase modifies whether you

wanted to or not that's what the

participle phrase modifies subject plus

the passive voice form of that part

will yield a test sentence that will

tell you whether the participant phrase

is modifying the thing you want it to

modify

The Description of Errors Involving Participial Phrases, Part II