Practice English Speaking&Listening with: Partnerships and Learning: Pesticide Label and Math Help Part 1 © 1992

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Hello and welcome to the grower pesticide certification program pre-course video. Concern

for the environment has prompted the Ontario governments food system 2002 program to

set a goal of reducing pesticide use by 50% early into the next century. One way of achieving

that goal is to update the knowledge of growers about the proper use of pesticides. Such simple

things as knowing the proper application rate, or how to calibrate your sprayer or even how

to use the information included on the product label is important to the proper use and handling

of a pesticide product. Recognizing that it has been some time since many growers have

been to school, Centralia college in co-operation with the Ontario Pesticide Education Program

and the literacy branch of the Ontario Ministry of Education has developed this pre-course

workbook and companion video. These materials are designed to help adults review their math

and English skills before taking the grower pesticide safety course. If you have trouble,

work with a family member or friend or take this workbook and video to your local adult

learning center. Your local high school, community college or local library will have information

on the adult learning center in your area. And remember careful use of pesticides will

not only prevent harmful effects on the environment, it will prevent unnecessary and tragic accidents.

If you havent been in a classroom for a while, the grower pesticide safety pre-course

should help you get over some of the jitters you might be feeling before taking the certification

program offered by Ridgetown College. The workbook and the accompanying video tape complement

each other so it is now possible for you to successfully complete this pre-course preparation

at home. Before we get started, lets take a moment to go through the workbook. The workbook

is made up of two sections, the first section contains math worksheets which will help you

prepare for the exam at the grower pesticide safety course. The worksheets show you different

kinds of questions and the math you need to answer them. This video is designed to lead

you step by step through the workbook, the best approach is to watch the video at the

same time as you work through the exercises. Keep in mind that if you prefer to measure

your field in hectares, you can do only those questions. If you prefer to measure your field

in acres, you can work only on those questions. In either case you will find a pocket calculator

will help you do the math more quickly. If youre more comfortable with mental arithmetic,

thats fine too. Take a moment now and flip through section one to become familiar with

the content. The worksheets have the following titles; find the area of a field; what is

the pesticide rate; how much pesticide should you buy; how much area will one spray tank

cover; how much pesticide to add to a full tank; how much area in your field is left

to spray; how much pesticide is needed for only part of a tank; how much spray mix is

needed for only part of a tank; sample problems; and last but by no means least, the answers!

Finding the area of a field in hectares. This section of the videotape will only be useful

to those who measure their fields in hectares. If you are more comfortable with acres, skip

this section and fast forward to this graphic, finding the area of a field in acres. The

first step in determining the total size of the field you are treating is to measure the

length and width. A measuring wheel as we have here is quite useful for this purpose.

A quick measurement of this field tells us that it is 300 meters wide by 1000 meters

long. In order to find the area of the field in square meters, we multiply the width by

the length. In this case 300 meters times 1000 meters which equals 300,000 square meters.

In order to find the number of hectares, we have to divide that number by 10,000, which

is the number of square meters in one hectare. This is what it looks like. Hectares equals

the length of the field times the width of the field divided by 10,000 square meters

per hectare. Heres how we determine the number of hectares in this field. We know

the area of our field, length times width. That number goes on the top line. We also

know that there are 10,000 square meters in a hectare. That number goes on the bottom

line. Now all we do is divide 10,000 square meters into 300,000 square meters and the

number we are left with is the answer. This field is a 30 hectare field. Practice this

calculation again to see if you come up with the same answer and then do question B in

your workbook from the math sheet entitledfind the area of a field in hectares”.

Remember, you can check your answers by turning to the answer pages at the end of section

one in your workbook. Finding the area of a field in acres. The first step in finding

out the total size of the fields you are treating is to measure their length and width. A measuring

wheel such as we have here, is quite useful for this purpose. This field is 250 feet wide

and 610 feet long. By multiplying the width, 250 feet, by the length, 610 feet , we get

the total area of the field, which is 152,500 square feet. In order to find the number of

acres, we have to divide that number 152,000 square feet by 43,560 which is the number

of square feet in one acre. This is what it looks like. Acres equals the length of the

field times the width of the field divided by 46,560 square feet per acre. We know the

area of our field, length times width, is 152,500 square feet. That number goes on the

top line. We also know that there are 43,560 square feet in an acre. That number goes on

the bottom line. By dividing the top number by the bottom number, we can find out how

many acres this field is. This field is 3.5 acres. After stopping the tape, practice this

calculation again to see you if come up with the same answer and the do question B in your

workbook on the math worksheet entitledfind the area of a field in acres”. Remember

you can check your answers by turning to the answer pages at the end of section one of

your workbook. What is the pesticide rate? Now that you know the area of the field you

are going to treat, it is important to know how much pesticide you should put on the field.

Applying too much pesticide is expensive and harmful to the crop, not applying enough can

leave you with poor control. That can also be expensive. Determining the pesticide rate

therefore is crucial. The pesticide rate is the amount of pesticide you apply over an

area of your land. We will also refer to the label rate and the converted label rate. The

label rate is the rate that appears on the product label. You will use this rate if you

measure your field in hectares. If you measure your field in acres then you must use a converted

label rate, which is the label rate multiplied by 0.4. In Canada, pesticide labels give the

rate in litres per hectare, millilitres per hectare, kilograms per hectare or grams per

hectare. If you measure the area of your field in hectares, you can use the rate shown on

the label. The label on this product says that to control quackgrass in soybeans use

Poast Liquid Emulsifiable Herbicide at a rate of 4.4 litres per hectare. Thats easy.

If you measure the area of your fields in acres, you will have to change the label rate

from litres per hectare to litres per acre. That also can be easy. To do this, multiply

the rate shown on the label by 0.4. This changes the label rate to the converted label rate

using litres per acre. Heres an example. The label rate on this jug is 4.4 litres per

hectare. Multipling 4.4 times 0.4 we get the converted label rate of 1.76 litres per acre.

Therefore if you use this product, you need 4.4 litres per hectare or if youre working

in acres 1.76 litres per acre. Remember if you want to use acres instead of hectares,

there is only one mathematical conversion you need to do. Label rate times 0.4 equals

the converted label rate. Stop the tape now and practice converting metric pesticide label

rates to litres per acre by doing Question 2B on the math worksheet entitledwhat

is the pesticide rate?”.

The Description of Partnerships and Learning: Pesticide Label and Math Help Part 1 © 1992