Practice English Speaking&Listening with: 10 More Leaked or Declassified Government Secrets

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We were going to put together a list ofthings the government could be hiding from you,”

as a kind of sober take on some of the more plausible conspiracy theories.

But, having already done a list of things they actually hid from us, it would have been

an underwhelming follow-up.

And for no good reason!

There are plenty more disturbing and/or bizarre secrets our governments would have preferred

to keep quiet.

10.

Project Horizon

Back in the late 1950s, the US was lagging behind in the space race.

In 1957, for example, the Soviets launched Sputnikthe first manmade satelliteinto

orbit, and Eisenhowers America was crestfallen.

Of course, it didnt help that many now saw the US as basically defenseless against

a Russian nuclear strike.

Their response?

They made plans to fire a nuke at the moon.

Its easy to see this as a kind of geopolitical temper tantrum, a toddler throwing his toys

at the wall, but for the Air Force it was aP.R. device.”

Above all, it was a wayto impress the world with the prowess of the United States.”

The flash of the detonation would be visible from Earth, said the experts, and, because

of the negligible lunar atmosphere, the dust would fly off in all directions (as opposed

to the usual mushroom cloud shape).

It would also leave a gaping lunar crater, forever changing the face of the Moon.

Ultimately, the plan was shelved.

But only when they came up with abetterone.

Documents declassified in 2014 revealed plans to build a base on the Moon.

Outpost Horizon was to be a permanent, nuclear-powered, and completely self-sustaining installation,

constructed by its inhabitants beneath the lunar surface.

It would have air locks, living quarters, dining and rec rooms, a hospital, science

labs and storage for explosives.

It was, in other words, dangerously ahead of its time.

The 12 men expected to live up there by 1965 were to drink their own urine, grow plants

in their poop, and look after chickens and fish.

And, if anyone lost their mind, there was a solitary confinement roomfor the complete

isolation of psychiatric patients.”

The plan was finally abandoned when NASA took over the space program.

9.

Acoustic Kitty

From missile-guiding pigeons to mine-detecting dolphins, animals have long been co-opted

for war.

As retrograde as it sounds now, behavioral conditioning to this end was at the forefront

of of military research back in the 1960s.

The I.Q. Zoo in Hot Springs, Arkansas was basically a front for such studies.

On the one hand, it was a quirky visitor attractiona place for the public to watch pigs playing

the piano, chickens playing baseball, macaws riding bicycles, and reindeer operating a

printing press (etc.).

But on the other, it was a top secret facility for training animal spiesbug-planting ravens,

mine-locating dogs, and the so-called Acoustic Kitty.

The idea for the latter was hatched while visually surveilling a target.

Since cats could be seen freely wandering in and out of the targets strategy sessions,

the CIA thought of bugging one to listen in.

But simply attaching a microphone wouldnt do.

Instead, researchers transformed a living cat into a $20 million radio transmitter.

They ran a wire through the ear canal to instruments inside the rib cage and spiraled a super-thin

antenna around the kittys tail.

Using ultrasound cues, they could also direct the cats movements left, right, and straight

on.

We dont know if it was ever deployed.

The fate of the project is murky.

Some say the Acoustic Kitty was flattened by a taxi just seconds into its very first

field test.

Others say the implants were removed and the kitty lived a long and happy life.

The CIA refuses to comment, although one declassified document does appear to suggest the impractical

project was canceled.

Anyway, now that we can eavesdrop with lasers, its likely to be a thing of the past.

8.

Mapimí Silent Zone

Usually when a country fires upon another, its considered an act of war.

But Americas long-suffering neighbor to the south has been known to let it slide.

On July 11, 1970, an ATHENA V-123-D rocket was fired at New Mexicos White Sands Missile

Range, but it overshot the target and landed near old Mexicos Bolsón de Mapimí insteadan

important ecosystem 200 miles south of the border.

The clean-up operation (with the help of the Mexicans) was huge, requiring a brand new

road just to get vehicles to the blast zone.

Hundreds of tons of cobalt-57-contaminated soil were removed, the radioactive isotope

having been added to the bomb to maximize fallout and civilian casualties.

Fortunately, the site had few if any humans.

But the bomb could have hit just about anywhere.

In a memo sent to Nixon, National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger made it out to be

an unforeseen blunderattributable to the missilesabnormal re-entry into the

atmosphere.”

However, the ATHENA program had already been suspended in July 1968 following three consecutive

flight failures.

And funding had been slashed between 1966 and 1969, forcing the Air Force to cut corners

with design.

Although officials involved in the program expressed safety concerns, they presumptuously

reasoned thatthe public is willing to accept some risk if such tests appear necessary

in the national interest.”

Far from an unforeseen blunder, the military allowed for such incidents; it expected them.

Nowadays, the blast site is known as the Mapimí Silent Zone, or sometimes as theMexican

Bermuda Triangle.”

And it may be no coincidence that its renown as a UFO hotspot outweighs any memory of American

hubris.

7.

1968 Thule Air Base B-52 crash

In our last list on this topic, we mentioned the 1961 Goldsboro B-52 crash, a potentially

apocalypticnuclear mishapthat you wouldve thought America had learned from.

Unfortunately not.

Almost seven years later to the day, on January 21, 1968, another nuclear-armed bomber hit

the dust (or snow, as it happens), this time on overseas territory.

The aircraft has been circling Thule Air Base in northern Greenland as part of Operation

Chrome Dome.

(These missions kept bombers on continuous airborne alert between 1960 and 1968, each

of them on standby to go and annihilate Moscow.)

When a fire broke out in the navigators compartment, however, the plane lost electrical

power and slammed into the ground just seven miles away from the base.

Actually, it slammed through the ground, blasting through the ice into North Star Bay at a speed

of 500 knots.

Six of the crew of seven ejected and the aircraft was destroyed upon impact.

Whatever was left was consumed by the fires of 200,000 pounds of jet fuel.

The casings of its four 1.1-megaton H-bombs were also destroyed, scattering tiny fragments

of highly radioactive tritium and plutonium across the crash site.

A major clean-up operation followed, involving scientists from Denmark and more than 70 federal

agencies.

And, while the major general in charge downplayed the extent of contamination, framing the incident

as anexcitingandclassic example of international cooperation,” many of those

involved suffered ailments later on.

Over the subsequent decades, hundreds of them contracted cancers and, of 500 Danes studied,

only 20 were able to have childrenseveral of which were born with deformities.

The US didnt even have express permission to be flying nukes over Danish territorymuch

less deploying them on the ground (as documents declassified in the90s show they did).

But did the Air Force finally learn its lesson?

Kind of.

Nuclear weapons were removed from all planes on airborne alert in the immediate aftermath

of the incident.

After all, it wasnt just Goldsboro and Thule; there had been eight other nuclear-armed

crashes.

More recently, however, there has been talk of a return to Chrome Dome-style strategy.

6.

1953 Iranian coup d’état

Historically, the US and UK have controlled oil supplies in the Middle East.

The Arabian-American Oil Company owned Saudi Arabias and the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company

(now BP) owned Irans.

But all that changed in 1950.

When the US finally gave in to pressure to start sharing revenue with the locals, Iran

expected Britain to follow suit.

And when it didnt, the Iranian PM Mohammad Mossadegh simply nationalized his countrys

oil industrydepriving the UK of any share and securing (or so he thought) crucial funding

for his program of liberal reforms.

In response, Britain conspired with the US to overthrow Mossadeghthe closest Iran

has ever come to a truly democratic and socialist leader, and one who intended to abolish the

monarchy.

Although he saw the first attack coming and arrested those involved, the coup against

him was ultimately successful.

The status quo was restored and BP got a share of the oil.

But such blatant interference by the US and UK earned them the nicknamethe Great Satan.”

And their 1953 coup d’état paved the way for the 1979 Islamic Revolutionthe devastating

transformation of a once progressive nation into the fundamentalist nightmare we see today.

5.

British establishment pedophiles

In November 2014, Londons Metropolitan Police finally agreed to investigate historical

claims of child sex abuse at the highest levels of government (and, more famously, in the

media).

These claims are mostly concentrated on the 1970s and80sat a time when senior police

officers and politicians, including Margaret Thatcher, are alleged to have blocked all

inquiries.

But the evidence has piled up in the shadows.

According to a prominent Member of Parliament (MP) in 2012, there isclear intelligence

suggesting a powerful paedophile network linked to parliament and No 10.”

Indeed, one senior lawyer claims to have seen records of government funding for the Paedophile

Information Exchangea pro-pedophile activist groupduring the 1970s.

Allegations from the victims are even more harrowing.

Survivors claim to have been trafficked via care homes into violent orgies with high-ranking

defense and intelligence officials, MPs, and others within the British establishment.

Even former Prime Minister Ted Heath has been implicated.

Allegedly a number of children were killed.

One twelve-year-old boy was raped and strangled by a Conservative MP, says a witness, and

another boy, a ten-year-old, was deliberately run over by a car.

This was apparently a display of his rapists legal immunity.

Of course, much of this has yet to be proven.

But declassified documents do suggest that investigations were blocked.

And, while the Metropolitan Police have attempted to dismiss the claims, the Crown Prosecution

Service admitted in 2015 there was enough evidence to prosecute at least one of the

accused: Lord Greville Janner.

But they refused to do so.

Citing hissevere dementiaand advanced age of 86, they argued that it wouldnt

bein the public interest.”

This is ironic given that Janner himself had, back in 1997, criticized the British justice

system for letting a similarly demented 86-year-old Nazi war criminal off the hook, fumingI

dont care what bloody age they are.”

Janner died in 2015 and the public hearing for allegations against him has been scheduled

for 2020.

Other investigations into British establishment pedophiles are ongoing.

4.

JTRIG/HSOC

In August 2013, Brazilian journalist David Miranda was detained in the UKunder Schedule

7 of the Terrorism Act.”

But he wasnt suspected of terrorism.

What security officials really wanted to know was how much he knew about British surveillance

programs, as well as those of the NSA.

Furthermore, by imposing the full nine hoursdetention afforded them under the Terrorism

Act, they hoped to send a warning to his husband, the American journalist Glenn Greenwald.

It didnt work.

Hours later, Greenwald released a statement of outraged defiance via the Guardians

website, knowing that GCHQ (Britains state surveillance agency) would probably see it

within minutes.

The following year, he won the Public Service Pulitzer for bringing Edward Snowdens NSA/Five

Eyes (FVEY) revelations to light.

Thanks to Greenwald, Miranda, and of course Snowden among others, most of us are by now

at least dimly aware that our governments are spying on us all.

But their fear of the internet, and hence their need to control it, goes deeper than

mass surveillance.

The Joint Threat Research Intelligence Group (JTRIG) is a unit within GCHQ whose aim it

is to sow discord and disinfo online.

It seeks to influence orgameonline interactions (e.g. forums, comments sections)

by applying theories of compliance and trust.

In other words, it employs an army of trolls.

Its partner-in-crime is the Human Science Operations Cell (HSOC), whose agents apparently

refer to themselves asmagicians of persuasion.”

Unnervingly, JTRIG also targets individuals.

But these targets neednt be criminals orterrorists.”

Investigative journalists, political activists, and other inconvenient civilian subtypeswho,

by virtue of their legal innocence, are rightly out of reach for law enforcementcan find

their reputations and livelihoods suddenly destroyed by vicious rumors spread online

or sent to their smartphone contacts.

As far as we know this happens all the time.

And not just in Britain.

These tactics are shared between each of the Five Eyes surveillance states: the UK, the

US, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand.

3.

Project MKUltra

During the 1950s and60s, LSD was revolutionizing psychotherapy (just as it probably will again).

Hollywood stars like Cary Grant and Esther Williams attributed life-changing revelations,

the overcoming of addictions, and the processing of childhood trauma to LSD-assisted therapy.

Breakthroughs expected to take years were happening within a few hours.

As Grant put it in an interview with Look magazine in 1959: “At last, I am close to

happiness.”

But the CIA was more interested in weaponizing the psychedelic.

Documents declassified in 1975 revealed a 20-year-long (1953-1973) human experimentation

project, exploring, among other things, whether LSD could be used for mind control.

Specifically, they wanted to be able to program people to carry out missionsor, as the

CIA put it, “do our bidding”—against their will and without any regard for survival.

Only rarely did participants consent, and even then they werent fully informed.

Electroshocks, sensory deprivation, and neurosurgery were also explored, and those subjected to

the tests included prisoners, medical professionals, cancer patients, prostitutes, children, and

animals.

In the 1960s, for instance, the CIAsuccessfullymade remote-controlled dogs.

Of course, its hardly possible to go into much detail herenot least because CIA Director

Richard Helms burned most of the records back in 1973.

And the fact thatonly20,000 documents remain, as a fraction of the original archive,

gives a sense of its overall scale.

But whats interesting is that MKUltra began the very same year that America adopted the

Nuremberg Code.

This international standard for research ethics emphasized the necessity for informed consent

and was expressly worded to prevent any repeat of Nazi-style human experimentation.

2.

Operation Cauldron

During the Cold War, the British were taught to fear the Soviets.

But their own government was more of a threat.

Between 1953 and 1964, the UKs chemical/biological warfare research unit, Porton Down, released

4,600 kilos of zinc cadmium sulphidea potential carcinogenfrom aircraft, ships, and trucks

onto civilian populations in Wiltshire, Bedfordshire, and Norfolk.

Then in 1964 they released Bacillus globigiilinked to food poisoning, eye infections, and sepsisinto

the London Underground.

They wanted to see how rapidly it spread through the Tube network.

Some might say the scientists werent aware of the risks, that in those days the research

was lacking.

But a number of them hadgrave misgivingsabout conducting the field trials.

And none of them could have been in any doubt whatsoever as to the toxicity of Pasteurella

[Yersinia] pestis (the Black Death or bubonic plague), which they released off the coast

of Scotland in 1952.

This test staked the lives of thousands of Hebridean islanders on the plague being blown

out to sea, and on the wind not simply changing direction.

That was irresponsible enough.

But when a fishing vessel unexpectedly appeared and passed through the cloud of live bacteria,

the governments response was even more disturbing.

Instead of alerting and quarantining the trawler, they allowed it to dock on the mainland.

In other words, Churchills post-war government was more prepared to risk an outbreak of plague

than to come clean about having released it.

As it turned out, the fishermen hadnt caught the Black Death.

But they had been affected by a number of other agents leaking from the tanker that

spread it.

This led to hair loss for at least one of them.

The government didnt learn from the test.

After burning all but one of the documents pertaining to it, they simply relocated their

research overseas.

Churchill personally approved a plan to test bioweapons in the colonies instead.

Bahamians were subjected to encephalomyelitis (a cause of fever, fatigue, and even death)

and Nigerians were subjected to nerve gas.

More than 14,000 British troops were also experimented on between 1945 and 1989.

The British military is now thought to have carried out more than 30,000 secret testsand

largely done away with the evidence.

1.

Operation Gladio

After WWII, with the threat of Soviet expansion looming, the US/UK-led NATO set up a network

of secret armies throughout Europe.

Modeled on the guerilla resistance movements of the war years, these groups were totally

unaccountable to citizens and often unknown to governments.

In fact, it wasnt until 1990 that European Parliament formally exposed and objected to

their existence.

Their job was to undermine the Communists at all costsand to keep doing so even if

the Communists won.

However, the Communists werent all that disliked.

The Italian Communist Party, for instance, was a valued part of the mainstreamdespite

US efforts to destroy it.

If Operation Gladio was to uphold Capitalism in Europe, therefore, it had to make people

hate Communism.

And it had to recruit the only people who hated it enough in the first place: Nazis.

NATOs illegal foot soldiers carried out terrorist attacks across the continent and

blamed them on the USSR.

Civilians, including children, were brutally murdered at random, including at the 1980

Oktoberfest in Munich.

It had to be at random and it had to involve children so that nobody nowhere felt safe.

Eventually, NATO assumed, everyone would be so afraid of the Commies they would eagerly

support previously unthinkable infringements of their hard-won civil liberties (such as

mass surveillance).

It was unusual for the perpetrators to survive these attacks, or if they did theyd be

unavailable for questioning.

However, in 1984, the neo-Fascist Gladio operative Vincenzo Vinciguerra was brought to trial

for a car bomb 12 years earlier.

He freely admitted his guilt but said he was under the protection of NATO, and furthermore

that he was one of many operatives.

Among the few people to actually believe him was the Italian judge Felice Casson, whose

subsequent digging around revealed NATOsstrategy of tension.”

This involved the execution of false-flag terror attacks to blame on fabricated enemies,

paralyzing the masses with fear to manufacture consent for just about anything: mass surveillance,

foreign wars, whatever.

Thisstrategy of tensionwas also behind Operation Northwoods (mentioned in the previous

list).

And theres absolutely no reason to believe its been taken off the table today.

Theenemieshave simply changed.

The Description of 10 More Leaked or Declassified Government Secrets