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Practice English Speaking&Listening with: 8 Phrasal Verbs for Business - plus linking rule for an American Accent

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in this video I will help you to speak

English more clearly and at the same

time speak English naturally like native

speakers do we will learn one important

rule about connecting words together

connecting words together is also called

linking when you link words you will

sound more like a native speaker

first you will practice one rule of

linking them I will teach you some very

common phrasal verbs expressions that

you can use at the workplace these are

everyday expressions that native

speakers use and you can use them in

either professional setting or in your

personal life as well and after that we

will practice using these phrasal verbs

while we also practice the rule of

linking that you will learn today and we

will say the phrasal verbs in natural

sounding sentences let's get started why

is linking so important first it will

make you sound more fluent and more

advanced when you're speaking English

advanced speakers speak like this how

much is it how much does it cost and of

course that's how native speakers talk

listen again how much is it I stressed

the word is but I connected everything

else listen to this how much does it

cost I stressed the word cost that's the

main word that's the verb that's the

word that holds the most meaning second

linking makes you think about which

words we should stress because if we

don't stress any word when we link our

speech will sound flat but when we think

about the word stress immediately our

speech sounds more natural it has more

passion and it also carries more meaning

and that creates the natural sounding

rhythm and melody of good native

sounding speech and third you might be

surprised about this one

linking will actually help you to speak

more clearly why is that because when we

link we connect the

final consonant to the next vowel that's

one of the rules that we will talk about

today and when we connect the final

consonant and we bring it to the front

we automatically pronounce it better for

example if I say kind of that D is

connected to the O and we say kind of

and now the D is in the beginning kind

of and a consonant is always easier to

pronounce when it's in the beginning of

the word than when it's at the end of

the word before we get started I want to

remind you blinking does not mean we're

speaking fast linking is smooth and

connected speech it's not fast speech

speaking faster or more slowly is often

related to word stress and word

reduction when we reduce words we say

them faster but not necessarily with

linking let's practice the linking rule

when a word finishes with the T or a D

sound and the following word begins with

the vowel sound look at the first

example most of let's link those

together most of most of or you can say

it as one word most of most of my

friends turned off it's difficult to

pronounce that final D turned off it's

much easier to say turned off turned off

now let's learn some common phrasal

verbs and then we will link them

together and finally we will say them in

natural sounding sentences the first one

is pay off pay off when we have a

phrasal verb we stress the preposition

we stress the second word listen again

pay off and in past tense let's link it

paid off

paid off to pay off means to have good

results when you make an effort and the

results are good and you are successful

your effort paid off and now let's say

it in a sentence our

investment really paid off

let's say that again and make sure

you're linking our investment really

paid off one more our hard work paid off

our hard work paid off the second

meaning of pay off is when you finish

paying alone you're finished with all

the payments and you don't owe any more

money you paid your loan off we finally

paid off our car loan we finally paid

off our car loan is your house paid off

is your house paid off the next one is

lay off and the past tense is laid off

let's link it laid off and that simply

means to lose your job many people were

laid off due to budget cuts let's say

that one more time

many people were laid off due to budget

cuts the next one is to wrap up and the

past dances wrapped up wrapped up in

this case the D actually has a tee sound

so we're gonna say wrapped up wrapped up

and to wrap up means to finish

completely when you finish a job

completely you can say it's all done

it's wrapped up or you can say we will

wrap up the meeting in a few minutes we

will wrap up soon to finish let's say

the sentence after the meeting wrapped

up everybody went home after the meeting

wrapped up everybody went home the next

one is burnout passed 10th burned out

let's link it again burned out when you

work very hard and you start getting

sick from work and you're so

lasted and you have to stop working you

burn out and this can happen to people

who work very hard they don't take a

break they don't take a vacation and

finally they burn out he burned out from

working 60 hours a week he burned out

from working 60 hours a week the next

one is to miss out and the past dances

missed out and once again that D is

pronounced like a T so we say missed out

and to miss out is to miss or to lose a

really good opportunity because you

didn't take action on time you didn't do

something and you missed out you missed

out on a good chance because we didn't

take action sooner we missed out on a

great investment opportunity let's say

that again because we didn't take action

sooner we missed out on a great

investment opportunity the next one is

to price out and the past senses priced

out and that one is very often used in

the passive voice for example we were

priced out they were priced out and if

you're priced out that means you can no

longer buy something because it has

become too expensive the price is

increased and you can't afford it

anymore

you were priced out if we don't buy now

we will be priced out of the market if

we don't buy now we will be priced out

of the market

and the next one is to call in and this

one is usually said as to call in sick

in the past tenses I called in sick when

you call your work to tell them you

can't come to work because you're sick

you call in sick our department is

short-staffed today because several

employees called in sick short-staffed

means not enough employees our

department is short-staffed today

because several employees called in sick

remember speaking clearly and

pronouncing all of the individual sounds

the vowels and the consonants should be

your first priority that way people will

understand you then practice stressing

the right words and linking them

together naturally and your American

accent will sound amazing

[Music]

you

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