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Practice English Speaking&Listening with: How to say the months of the year in English

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Hello! Great to see you here again. Today we're going to learn how to say the

months of the year in English. If you'd like to improve your

English, I suggest you hit the subscribe button, as I'll be making many more

videos like this. Okay let's get to it! The first month is January,

which starts with the /dʒ/ voiced consonant sound as in joy. When I say voiced

consonant sound it means that we need to use our vocal cords to create some

vibration. So that's /dʒ/, /dʒ/ as in joy. This is followed by the /æ/ vowel sound

as in cat, and finishes on the n consonant sound as in now. So that's jan,

jan. The next syllable is the /ju/ vowel sound, single u vowel sound, as in you, me,

you. So we have Jan-u. After this we have the schwa vowel sound /ə/. If you're

not familiar with the schwa sound, and you should be as it's the most

common sound in English, I will share a link to a video on the schwa at the end

of this lesson. After the schwa sound we finish on the

/ri/ consonant cluster, as in every. So we have Jan-u-ary, Jan-u-ary,

January with the stress on the first syllable. So the second month is February

now there are a few different ways to pronounce February, but I'm going to use the easiest and

perhaps the most common, by not pronouncing the first letter R. So we

start with the unvoiced /f/ consonant sound, which we make by placing our top

teeth onto our bottom lip and blowing like so /f/, /f/. This is then followed by

the /ɛ/ vowel sound, as in bread. Finishing on the voiced /b/ consonant, /b/,

/b/. So we have Feb. Next we skip the letter R and

go straight to the /ʊ/ vowel sound /ʊ/ as in you. So we have feb-u. The final

syllable is the same as in January, we have the schwa vowel sound and the /ri/

consonant cluster /ri/. So we have Feb-u-ary.

Feb-u-ary, February, February,

with the stress on the first syllable. The third month is March, which starts with a

nasal /m/ consonant sound. We can make this sound in the same way to make the /b/

consonant sound. Starting with your lips together, but instead of vibrating your

vocal cords, you want to push the air through the nose like so, mmm. The /m/

consonant then follows into the long /ɑː/ vowel as in car. Notice in British English,

unlike American English, if we have a vowel sound and then the letter R we

don't pronounce the letter R instead we extend the pitch on the vowel sound. So it

should sound like this ma: ma:, not ma ma ma. We then end with the strong /tʃ/

consonant sound as in choose. To make this sound place the tip of your tongue on

your top ridge in your mouth just behind your top teeth, and you want to end with your

tongue in the middle of your mouth, CH, CH. So altogether and one syllable

we have March March. So the 4th month is April. Now this is the time of the year

that I quite enjoy, if I'm living in England, which I am at the moment,

in London. Because after the long winter this is the time when things start to warm

up, we start to get the spring weather. So how do we say this month. Well it begins

with /eɪ/ diphthong vowel sound as in day. A diphthong sound is when we combine two

vowel sounds together. Listen carefully for the E sound at the end. /eɪ/, /eɪ/.

The second syllable starts with the /pr/ consonant cluster, as in present. To make

the P sound, which is an unvoiced sound. Place the lips together and simply blow out from

the lips with an explosive sound like so, P, P.

We then need to combine the P consonant sound with the voiced R consonant sound.

So we need to use our vocal cords, and you need to place your tongue in the

middle of the mouth, pointing up towards the roof of the mouth, like so R.

We then end with the schwa sound and the voicedl/ consonant sound. Make the /l/

consonant sound by raising the tip of the tongue to the roof of the mouth, and

vibrate the vocal cords. So together we have A-pril, A-pril. With the stress on the

first syllable, April. Now we have the fifth month, which is May. I think you'll

like this month as it's really easy to say. We start with the nasal /m/

consonant sound, as in March. So that's M. Followed by the /eɪ/

diphthong as in day, and again listen for that e, this is two consonant sounds

together. So it's one syllable, so it should be May, May, May. The sixth month is June.

This is my favorite month as my birthday's in June. It's also a great

time to be in England, beautiful warm weather, really long days,

sunset 9:30-10 o'clock at night. I love it!

June starts with the same /dʒ/ consonant sound as in January, followed by the long

vowel /uː/ as in tune. Then we end on the nasal /n/ consonant. So we have June, June.

Notice there's an E at the end of June, but this is actually what we call a

silent e, or a magic e. This is very common in English, often when you see an

e at the end of the word we don't pronounce that e. But it indicates to us

that we need to lengthen the previous vowel sound, in this case the U. So we

lengthen the pitch. So we have June June. If you'd like to know more about the

magic E or the silent E, I've made a video and I'll share a link at the end of this

lesson. Well, if you're still with me, well done. We've come a long way. Now for the

seventh month, which is July. July starts with the same /dʒ/ consonant sound as in

January. Followed by the short vowel /u/ as in put.To make this vowel sound you

want the tongue in the back of your mouth. The last syllable starts with the

/l/ consonant and finishes on the /aɪ/ diphthong as in May. So that's two

syllables. Ju-ly, ju-ly. The stress is on the second syllable July, July. So the

eighth month is August. Now August is a two syllable word, and the first is an

unstressed syllable and we start with the long vowel sound /ɔː/. We make the

sound at the back of the throat with the tongue pulled back, and it's aw as in law.

The second syllable starts with the voiced /g/ consonant. /g/ as

in girl. Now you need to relax the tongue, block air at the back of the throat, and

then suddenly release the air, and the lips stay open. G, G.

This follows into the short vowel sound /ʌ/ as in fun. Finishing on the /st/

consonant cluster. To make the /st/ consonant cluster, place the tip of your

tongue on the ridge just behind your top teeth, push air between the tongue and

the ridge to make the /s/ sound. Then block air by pushing the tip of the

tongue against the ridge, and then suddenly release the air to make the T

sound. So we have August, August. It's a two syllable word stress on the second

syllable. August, August. Ok guys we've come a long way, now for the 9th month,

which is September. Now September is a three syllable word, with the stress on

the second syllable. September September. So the first syllable starts with the /s/

consonant sound, followed by the single /e/ vowel as in bread. Then the /p/

consonant. But don't release the air on the P, instead we release on the T in the

next syllable. So that should be Sep, Sep. The second syllable, which is the stressed

syllable, starts with the /t/ consonant sound, and the single /e/ vowel as in

bread, and finishes on the /m/ consonant. tem, tem. The final syllable is the same as all

the final syllables on the remaining months, and it's very simple. It's just

the /b/ consonant sound and the schwa sound, /bə/, /bə/. So we have all three

syllables together sep-tem-ba, sep-tem-ba, September September.

Okay now we have the tenth month, which is October. October is a three syllable

word, with stress on the second syllable. Now we start with the /ɒ/ vowel as in top. We

make the sound at the back of the throat with the tongue pulled back. We follow

this vowel sound with the strong /k/ consonant sound, as in cash. So that's Oc,

Oc. The second syllable ,which is the stressed syllable, starts with a strong /t/

consonant sound followed by the /oʊ/ diphthong sound as in no. So that

should be toe, toe. And the final syllable is the same as in September,

it's the /b/ consonant sound and the schwa, ba, so together that's oc-to-ba,

oc-to-ba, October. So just two more months to go. Hang in there we're doing

very well. So the eleventh month is November. Again, November is a three

syllable word, with stress on the second syllable. The first syllable is very

simple, it starts with the /n/ consonant sound, followed by the /oʊ/ vowel diphthong as it no.

No, No. The second syllable which is the stressed syllable, starts

with the /v/ voiced consonant sound. To make this sound place the top teeth on

to the bottom lip, and blow air through. It's very similar to the /f/ consonant

sound, but this time it's a little bit longer, and with lots of vibration, so we really

need to use the vocal cords, like so, V, The /v/ consonant sound

is followed by the single /e/ vowel as in bread, finishing on the /m/

consonant sound. So that's vem, vem. The final syllable is the same as in

September, it's the /b/ and the schwa sound, Ba. So together we have, no-vem-ba, no-vem-ba.

Remember the stress is on the second syllable. November, November,

November.

Okay guys so here we are on the final month, well done!

So this is the twelfth month, which is December. Again December is a three

syllable word, with the stress on the second syllable. Now we start with the

voiced /d/ consonant sound as in door. To make this sound place the tip of your

tongue on the ridge of the roof of your mouth, just behind your top teeth. By

doing this you want to block the air, and then suddenly release the air by pulling

the tip of your tongue away from the ridge. This is very similar to the way

you make the T consonant sound, but this time there should be some vibration.

D, D. The /d/ follows into the short single /i/ vowel sounds and sit. To

make this sound the tongue should be towards the front of the mouth. Di, Di. The

second syllable starts with the /s/ consonant sound and follows into the

single /e/ vowel sound as in bread and finishes on the /m/ consonant. Cem, cem. And

the final consonant is the same as in the last few months, it's the /b/ consonant

and the schwa sound. Ba. So together we have De-cem-ba, De-cem-ba. Remember the

stress is on the second syllable, de-cem-ba. December, December. Okay finally let's go

through the months together. Repeat after me. January,

February, March, April, May, June, July,

September, October, November and December.

Don't forget if you'd like to learn about the schwa click here. If you'd like

to learn about the magic e click here.

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