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Practice English Speaking&Listening with: KAZ: Pushing The Virtual Divide - Gran Turismo Documentary (Full Movie)

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Flow state is an optimal....

It's the most optimal mindset that we're in.

It's the most efficient brain and mind processing known to us.

And when we drop into a flow state...

...we tend to almost have a magical experience.

It's not magic.

But there's a sense of awe that comes with it. There's a distortion of time.

...and when I speak to great athletes

people at the top of their game

at what they do

most people report that it's somewhere

between 10 and 15 percent of the time.

Which means that the majority of the time...

...even the best in the world...

...they're working.

They're not dropped into this

easy flow process

where everything is proficient.

They're working,

and they're working

really hard to try to bring their mind

...to a positive mindset. And that's where the real work is.

If you can hang out in a positive mind long enough...

...the idea is that you'll slip into no mind.

I think we play games for a lot of reasons.

I think

There's obviously a lot of psychology involved...

...in just the basic reward mechanisms

that you feel good when that dopamine comes in.

You have fun, you win.

It's a way for us to win on a way

that doesn't have a lot of risk involved...

...but we can really get that psychological thrill.

And I think with "Gran Turismo," it offers that sense--

Especially now where you can play online with people.

--that you really reaffirm the skills that you've refined.

You say, "I am better than that other person."

And it's a way-- A safe environment for us to test ourselves, I think...

...and to experience-- To challenge ourselves...

...and to experience what we're actually capable of.

Meeting for the first time and hearing he races and--

Not only races, wins a lot. That's kind of incredible.

He's a really good driver. I was surprised.

I drove with him at Motegi at "Gran Turismo 2."

And, yeah, I just go, "He's--" It's, like, "I get it now.

Now I know why this game is so accurate

and so representative of the real thing.

The guy who created it...

...he knows how to drive."

He races, which puts him at a different level,

so he understands what he's doing.

It's not just simulating it.

He actually has a reference point of what real racing is about.

When you have reference point, that's going in the game.

We were just in review with him on a project.

He gave insights to things he thought, "I think this would be important.

This is what you need to do for the real car."

So he can pull reality from his experiences...

...and apply it to the application of a project.

I think...

pioneers that are doing something unique and new,

people wanna listen to.

He's proven. He has a pedigree...

...that I think gives him a lot of leeway

to do some unique things.

Question 12.

The game is nearly perfect.

What else do you think you can improve on? What else is there left to do?

Kazunori

Joined Sony Music Entertainment Japan

...which was the music company and obviously...

...publishing and producing music.

And Sony Music Japan at that time had a small video game group...

...producing games for Nintendo and Sega systems.

So he joined Sony Music Entertainment Japan.

and became one of the young members...

...producing titles for those systems.

Back in the early '90s...

when Sony was first starting to think about a PlayStation console

...Kazunori wanted to produce this car game...

...that he'd wanted to produce since he was 15 years old.

And he approached the Sony executives...

and the people in charge of the games at the time that

And explained to them what he wanted to do.

But they really weren't interested in a car game.

They presumably weren't car people, they didn't think...

...that a game that technical or that focused would really sell.

"Motor Toon Grand Prix"!

The amazing car physics engine was so realistic...

...and the industry people noticed what Kazunori team was doing...

...and became something to watch out for.

And, of course his team's third project was the "Gran Turismo".

So when we waited long enough...

...to have something tangible that we could show...

...that was the early prototype of the "Gran Turismo"...

...with the amazing...

...never-seen-before reflection mapping of the car.

You know, when the car spins, the lighting reflections changes...

...it was amazing.

There are scenes on "Gran Turismo"...

...and there's a camera shot of a beautiful car...

...set in a beautiful location...

...moving in different locations looking at the car.

And you look at it, and you could sit there for a good five, 10 minutes...

...just staring at the screen.

It's just-- It's a work of art. And....

But when it comes down to it, it's just code.

But I think it's a bit more than that, really.

They say code is poetry.

That's a computer science term...

...when you learn to program, they say, "It should be like poetry."

It makes you think about cars differently.

It makes you think about the world differently.

I have learnt so much about other countries...

...and other forms of racing and other people.

I've read the documents that go along with the cars and the tracks...

...and you learn so much.

It makes your world much bigger after you've experienced the game.

But really, if you say, "What is the game?"

It boils down to these lines of code.

One of the interesting aspects of modern origami is that...

...in many cases...

...you can't break it down into step-by-step processes...

...like the traditional origami.

All the folds have to come together almost at once...

...so with that type of design...

...we'll very often spend some time...

...putting in all the creases ahead of time...

...and then try to bring all of them together at once.

It's a skeleton, it's a scaffolding.

And a crease pattern captures the important elements of something...

...but it rarely captures every fold in the figure.

And so it's less than a blueprint.

It's more of the abstract essence.

I need to get from...

...the subject to a folded representation of the subject...

...and I can break that down into steps.

And the first step is to figure out...

...what are the elements of the subject

...that I wanna replicate in the paper?

Because any representational origami...

...it's not a perfect photograph or a perfect sculpture.

It's not a perfect reproduction.

We have to pick certain elements...

...that are gonna call that subject...

to the mind of the viewer when they see it.

One way of describing the abstraction is making a stick figure or a drawing.

That tells me how many legs, how long they are and so forth.

And that's pretty easy step because we can--

We can draw stick figures pretty easily.

That's our first step of drawing when we're a child.

But going from the stick figure to a paper shape that has

...the same structure that's the step...

that is particularly amenable to mathematics.

I began to see a lot of these...

...principles in origami...

...like the principles that governed engineering...

...and that one could use mathematics to do better art.

There's really deep connections...

...between the meshing problem of 3D gaming...

...and the crease pattern problem of origami design.

And so there are origami algorithms...

...that are basically meshing algorithms that say:

"Represent this surface by a bunch of polygons...

...that satisfy certain rules about their positions and angles."

What we're trying to do as an origami artist...

...what Kazunori is trying to do as a video game...

...is create an experience inside someone else's brain.

And so you have to put yourself in there.

And so the decisions that we make in this abstraction process...

...are not just what to include, what to omit...

...but also what to exaggerate...

...what to put in that's not actually there...

...but that will give the desired result in the viewer's mind.

In everything we do here...

...everybody's always amazed that...

we still sculpt full-size clay cars.

Every day we do that. We have a set of craftsmen sculptors that do it...

...and we'll mill the car...

...bring it back onto a plate...

...model it by hand, white-light scan it...

...bring it back into the tube, tune it again, go back and forth.

It's a little bit of an artistic ballet between digital and analogue.

And we may build a polygonal model, math model...

...mill it out in one of our giant mills, but at the end of the day,

it's a craftsman's hand...

...cleaning the model down, getting the lines right.

I think at the end of the day it'll always be touched...

...by the human hand to make it....

Or give it that soul, I guess.

I started working out of my mom's garage.

Just driven to, you know....

To get my hands at shaping, I used to strip down old longboards.

And that's how I kind of started.

I've been doing it since the summer of 1973, so...

...this'll be going into my fifth decade of shaping boards.

As a shaper, the holy grail is like when a customer brings...

...a board to you and it's a magic board and he says:

"You know, can you replicate this exact board?"

And so that eventually started down that CNC road and the accuracy...

...and being able to obtain empirical data...

...that you can always go back to reference.

This has been like an eight-year process...

...for me to build this machine.

I originally had no background...

...in CNC technology or CAD/CAM technology...

...so it was-- It was a long project for me.

What's common nowadays is they have the turnkey shaping machines...

...that you can purchase...

...and you're basically writing programs in 2D.

The algorithm formulates the third dimension.

You're not working in true 3D.

The way I actually do it is I take my hand shapes...

...and actually digitize the entire surface and....

So it maintains the natural hand-shaped....

I don't know what you would call it, just the non-algorithmic look...

...so it has more of a hand-shaped, non-digital appearance to it.

Right now, what I'm doing...

...is just basically taking down all the tool path...

...that the CNC machine has cut with the program...

...that I've written for the board.

Aesthetic is really nice.

But, you know, I try to add little style points to the boards for sure.

But the rider is the one that has a soul...

...and the rider and the board have to connect.

And, you know, ultimately, if I fail at that point there...

...you know, I've basically failed as a shaper.

It really, really mimics real driving.

It really explains understeer, oversteer.

Not just explains, it demonstrates it.

I could talk understeer, oversteer to someone here at a restaurant randomly.

They're not gonna know what I'm talking about.

But when I go to the game, these cars do that.

There's so many variables involved...

...in terms of the contact patch the tire makes with the asphalt.

Types of conditions in "Gran Turismo," there's snow and dirt and asphalt.

They also have to take into consideration the controllers.

It's an engineering project that is....

Kazunori put it on par with the Apollo Project.

And as crazy as that sounds, I think he's probably right.

That's-- It's a massive, massive engineering undertaking.

There's a lot of history in objects that have existed...

...and had another purpose.

And bringing that energy, that previous energy...

...into a sculpture...

...brings a lot of new unexpected surprises together.

I did start drawing probably before I could talk as a child.

It was really a very easy thing for me.

I remember my first studio space was...

...the wayback of the family station wagon...

...where my younger sister and I would sit with...

...safety scissors, colored paper...

...and crayons and all that, and that's how we went...

...on our family trips.

As soon as I graduated art school, I took a full-certified welding class.

And it just seemed like the next logical step for me.

I didn't expect to build a bridge or building...

...but I wanted to understand the medium.

I wanted to understand all of the right ways to do it...

...and how far it could be pushed.

In my mind, it changed how I looked at things a lot.

I no longer saw things as being broken or useless.

I saw them as waiting to be repurposed or fixed or modified in some fashion.

All of the giant figures were...

...designed to represent different religions from around the world.

I think what's kind of unique about the experience of these...

...is from a distance, you see a large silhouette.

As you approach, you can start recognizing...

...that there are items that are familiar to you.

Whether it's a spring or a kitchen faucet or a tool...

...there's a lot that people can relate to in these.

And I think it's kind of amusing to discover these little bits.

I want people to be drawn up into the magic of the sculpture...

...forget anything about reality, to think it's always been there...

...and they discovered it, and it was there for them.

I think that is the height of the artistic journey...

...is when a viewer is unaware that this has, you know...

...16 outriggers underneath the ground that are holding it up, you know.

They don't understand the engineering behind all that, and they shouldn't.

If I've done my job well, they don't even think about it.

I think to take a car out of the context of a parking lot...

...and put it on a pedestal...

...you're forced to look at it as an artistic object...

...and to see its physical characteristics.

I first got on this track, I'd say, I was 5. I grew up here.

This is where I started my racing career.

Dave helped me tremendously just learning how to drive...

...and just get me to that next level to start my career.

And let's go over some stuff on our board.

Remember points of measurement? Say "turning point."

-Turning point. -Say "apex."

-Apex.

"Release the car all the way to the exit."

-Release the car all the way to the exit.

Release to the exit, and when we release to the exit...

...we get grip in the rear, right?

-Remember the whale's back? -Yes.

If you dive in too soon, it sends all your energy to the pit.

We wanna come in, sacrifice, touch...

...add, add, more, more, more, most.

Sacrifice to be efficient, to be effective.

What's effective?

Fast, momentum carrying it uphill, right?

All the way up.

Let me have your helmet. Come here.

Watch, guys. Watch, watch, watch. Two mechanisms.

Watch what happens here.

Watch, watch.

Feeding my chin, feed my hands, feed my chin, feed my hands, right?

Feed, feed. That's gonna prevent you from leaning, right?

All the bite and grip comes from the outside tires.

So we feed, we feed, right?

-You guys ready for your day? -Yes.

Not a whole lot of sugar, tons of water, okay?

So Mitchell is 15...

...and he is a Red Bull athlete.

They picked him up about two years ago, so he was...

...the youngest in their arsenal of athletes.

And he transitioned in from go-karts to off-road racing trucks...

...to open-wheel, and now Global RallyCross.

So he's got about 10 years of driving experience...

...but he doesn't even have a legal driver's license yet.

So it's pretty cool.

I'm seriously thinking about doing an axle change.

I think the car is loose.

-Said something about it being loose, it was great.

Then he said it was sticking, so....

That's the beauty of having a 7-year-old for your....

For your driver input.

All right, front end's good.

Cole, hand me the ratchet, son. I'm gonna change the rear width, and--

Yep. Put the front tires on. We've only got about three.

Thank you, sir.

We only have about five minutes to the main, to the heat race.

How much do you have invested in that car?

The car itself? Or the entire program?

Program.

I'm embarrassed to say.

But I do havemy wife's buy-in, so I'm good.

Upwards of 25 to 30, in terms of just capital cost.

And then the operating expense becomes...

...probably thousand to 1200 barring no major incident.

With major incident, we can get into a couple of thousand.

I mean, I can't remember the go-karting cost.

I do know it does get expensive even at a young age...

...because a lot of the...

...fathers would show up with nine different motors for their...

...little kid's go-kart for a race, and--

How do you compete with that? We'd have one, a tired backup motor.

So we just-- That's what we did.

And when you transition into off-road trucks...

...that got expensive.

I mean, that was probably....

We were probably sinking 70, 80,000 dollars...

...just for S-series in a little off-road truck.

You have repairs and practices and motor rebuilds.

Now that he is going into the RallyCross...

...I honestly couldn't tell you how much that's gonna cost.

Look at my line, guys.

Look at my line.

Look what direction I'm headed.

Come with me.

Look at the direction.

Turn and point.

Apex.

Apex.

What's an apex?

Point of measurement.

-What's an apex? -Point of measurement.

-What's an apex? -Point of measurement.

-What's an apex? -Point of measurement.

Apex.

Release.

All right, guys, and we are ready to spark. Please go ahead.

All right, ladies and gentlemen. Start engines.

Go all the way through, right?

Go a little faster, a little faster.

Go faster, faster, faster.

Keep it going. Keep it-- Just keep it going. Keep it go--

-Go!

It's so incredibly hard to get into motor sport.

As anybody who's done it or tried to do it knows.

It's one of the most expensive hobbies that you can find.

There's a certain mystique about a race car driver that is....

It's romanticized in a lot of ways.

And for good reason, you have to be very lucky and very...

...fortunate in so many different ways to make it.

To have something like "Gran Turismo" where you can develop your skills...

...in your living room. You can-- For just a few hundred dollars.

There's few games that can teach you something...

...that applies that directly to a real-world situation...

...like the GT Academy obviously is a good example of that...

...where skills learned in the game have translated...

...perfectly one-to-one...

...with skills on the racetrack, the real racetrack.

Being a race car driver...

...has been my dream since I was a young boy.

It would mean everything to be a part of the Nissan racing team.

My passion is to drive cars, this is my opportunity.

To get that shot to drive in front of people who matter.

I'm Dhani Jones, host of GT Academy.

Four hundred thousand "Gran Turismo 5" gamers entered a contest...

...hoping their skills in the game will transfer to the track.

Only the 16 fastest will fight for the ultimate prize:

The prestigious red helmet...

...and a shot at becoming a...

...professional race car driver for Nissan.

These guys come, they've been racing on a game...

...which is, unless you're good, you can't go fast.

And we take them,and they've got no knowledge...

...about the world we're in, the world here at Silverstone.

And we can then train them using the skills they've got...

...from the game, in the right way so they haven't got any bad habits.

We can teach them the right way to become racing drivers.

Computer Voice: Get ready. Go.

When the guys win the competition...

...they go on Driver Development Program...

...which is a physical, mental driver coaching program.

It's pretty intense.

They're going through physical exercise every day...

...mental coaching at least two, three times a week...

...they're on a simulator...

...driver coaching, as well as being out on the track.

So it's a pretty intense time. We work with them for three months...

...to get them prepared and ready for their first race.

You know when you're doing something right...

...when there's people moaning about it...

...viciously.

It means that you're doing something to upset the establishment.

And that's what we've done.

But as we've progressed, people realized these guys...

...are genuinely fast young racing drivers.

They're faster than some of their peers...

...but they've only raced for one, two, three years,

...and yet they're to the level...

...or above the level of kids that have been racing for 15 years.

Well, for me...

I have to say Le Mans. Competing Le Mans for the first time...

...back in 2011...

...was very special.

Dreaming to be in that race and obviously then...

...finishing second in the podium...

...with the pole position in qualifying...

...was a really great weekend for me...

...and, you know, it was a dream become true.

Dream come true for me and for Nissan...

...and for.... The GT Academy story was amazing.

First time, first try in Le Mans, bam, in the podium.

Okay. If we'd have had one driver that was good...

...okay, it was luck.

We've got a consistent group of drivers every year...

...from different parts of the world that are really good racing drivers.

This is not luck. Genuinely, if you're a good gamer on "Gran Turismo"...

...we can make you into a good racing driver.

GT Academy is, in my view...

...first and foremost, a life-changing program.

It takes people from nothing, if you like...

...to something very, very special.

It gives them inner belief, it gives them self-confidence...

...and it gives them the skills.

Not just skills behind the wheel,...

...but skills in front of camera, skills in PR.

And it gives them all of that, and makes of them...

...professional race drivers.

I think, as a child...

...being a racing driver was my ambition.

I've dreamed of it before, and....

But I can honestly say...

...I've never dreamt that it would happen this way...

...through playing "Gran Turismo."

I mean, who thinks of that?

Every time we meet it's great.

For me, he's like a big mentor for me.

Every time I have meetings or chats...

...or competing with him in Nürburgring 24 hours...

...it's a special moment, no?

Obviously, every time I see him, I try to....

You know, to spend most of the time with him, learning from him...

...and obviously, he's the creator of "Gran Turismo,"

The simulator which make me a professional racing driver...

...so I have to, you know-- I have to thank him for everything.

That's why I'm here today and....

I don't know what to say.

The awareness that, in this arc...

...towards high performance, towards mastery...

...that there is a dark side or there's...

...real challenges to the spirit...

...and to the psychology and to relationships.

That insight...

...typically comes from somebody who's been down that path.

And the insight to be able to know...

...that men who are pursuing something that's very important to them...

...that there's both a part that is glorious and to celebrate...

...and there's also a really challenging dark side to it.

It's really insightful.

And if we're not careful...

...we can set people up for the ride...

...and not take care of the other side of it.

And to have that insight...

...to be able to support and challenge...

...and provide opportunity...

...that's noble.

In Japanese, tōge means canyon road or mountain road.

The winding road, basically.

We just went through the tunnel...

...which was actually the...

...starting point of my favorite tōge road...

...near my hometown.

This is basically the place I learned how to drive.

Ten years ago, I was driving canyon road just for fun...

...and then I just had the opportunity to compete in the States.

Back then, professional drifting wasn't that big neither...

...like, it's not as big as mainstream racing...

...but it grow so much after 10 years...

...and I guess my dream came true...

...that I'm now a professional driver.

It's not like driving purely for fun.

I have to beat other people.

And I have a lot of sponsors so I have to do well, stuff like that.

So sometimes, it's not only fun.

Sometimes, it's very difficult.

But when I come to a mountain road like this...

...it kind of always reminds me how much I enjoy just driving.

My goal past 10 years...

...to win the championship of my Formula D career...

...and I achieved that goal...

...two years ago, 2011.

Now, another thing that I wanna achieve...

...is to have my car in the "Gran Turismo."

Because Kazunori and all the other guys...

...in "Gran Turismo" are really picky...

...about what kind of car they wanna have in the game.

So if one of my race car be in the game, that means...

...I'm one of the good ones.

We really pay respect to what the guys did in the '30s...

...and '40s and '50s...

...though the racing cars get crashed, they get modified and changed a lot.

We see our job as putting it back...

...to exactly how the cars left Lotus or Cooper or Ferrari...

...back in-- Back in the day.

We study pictures, we get chassis drawings.

The guys would go to endless lengths to get something right.

No, it is attention to detail and maybe a little bit obsessive.

I think the people that made these cars were real artisans.

Doing it over a long period of time, they've just had so much experience...

...on how to make proper steels.

It's almost like a black art.

Car design has as much about emotion and psychology...

...as it does about hardware and real engineering.

It's that psychology and the emotional connection...

...that I think in the game you get that is very, very different.

To come across, to rise...

...see sun hitting you at a different point of view...

...to hear shifting inside the car.

The very thing that you can imagine the car being, as a designer....

A car designer has to use his imagination as part of--

Drive the creativity that he's doing.

And so when you're drawing a car, you're thinking,

"What do I want to see?

What are the reflections I wanna see on the side of the car?" That's huge.

In the game, you can see it.

We did a project, a concept vehicle project.

We spent two years just trying to make sure, "Do we understand the values...

...the attributes, the dreams of these generations? Where are they?"

It was interesting. When we talked to these kids and we said:

"Well, why don't you know who we are?"

They said, "You're not where we're at."

And that was-- That was a daunting task.

We're advertising everywhere. We're racing teams.

Selling cars all over the place. How can we not be where you're at?

When you look at the impact of games and what they do--

I mean, as a casual experience and lifestyle...

...these kids and games, they spend a lot of time in games.

It's a place where they interact with...

...each other, they socialize, prove themselves.

It's a recreation period of time.

And so we thought, "Well, we're not really there."

Please welcome the president of Polyphony Digital...

...and professional race car driver, Kazunori Yamauchi.

So we thought, "Why don't we design concept cars for games?

What if we created the cars that we can't...

...even build in reality, in a game?

What if we gave you the chance to drive a Corvette...

...with camouflage on it...

...before anybody gets a chance to do it?"

Starting today...

...everyone can drive a camouflaged Corvette test vehicle...

...on Sony PlayStation's "Gran Turismo 5."

When it came out in the game, the camouflage car initially...

...there was a bit of leakage which wasn't planned or expected...

...so that was like:

Everybody breathed hard.

The game boards went crazy. Something that was never expected to happen.

...it's like, now all of a sudden.

People who never would've talked about Corvettes...

...were talking about Corvettes.

We designed simulators for Kazunori and the guys here in the studio.

We had them on the ground at the Detroit show.

Those simulators when driving the Corvette...

...were so in demand...

...it completely outstripped our ability to support it.

And we couldn't put enough people through the whole system.

There was a long line around the exhibit...

...for people wanting to drive the Corvette.

So I think we've had to adjust...

...and kind of move things on the fly.

...the response among the gaming community...

...has been so profound and so significant.

Ladies and gentlemen, this is the new Corvette.

We launched it simultaneously in Detroit.

And they pulled a virtual cover off it on the game.

Kazunori is emotional about this. This is personal to him.

He needs to see the vehicle, he spent time in Detroit...

...to go through the program.

He says, "Yes, this will go. We'll put this in the game."

So it's not just anybody can build a car...

...and throw it in the game and it's good to go.

I believe their sense of--

As enthusiasts, they only want the best.

So it was the right car, right time.

It's an interesting problem to think about anyway.

What kind of idea-- What would our ideal GT car be?

I don't know, for me, it's more in the pure sports car vein.

But pushing technology and pushing design...

...to a more advanced condition.

Some companies, they really celebrate their history and their heritage.

We, Toyota, we tend to....

We tend to be looking more ahead, more down the road than behind us.

So maybe there's something just in the spirit of our company...

...and, you know, trying to innovate--

We're always trying to innovate and challenge.

So I think there's some mindset that way.

Ultimately we all wanna make these cars...

...and you dream about them.

...and I think technology today, along with "Gran Turismo"...

...is like, you could bring that closer to reality...

...a lot quicker, you know.

For us as designers as well, and I think consumers as well...

...it's like making the dream reality, really, you know.

Talking about making new cars, you know, they're just--

-Ideas never stop. -Oh, yeah.

The creative expression, the ability to become so masterful at something...

...and so thoughtful in the basic elements of how it works...

...that's when the artist in all of us can be expressed...

...whether that's in a car, whether that's with a canvas...

...wheither's that's in a relationship or a conversation...

...there's a creative process to be able to be fully here now.

And that's....

I think that's what we're all looking for...

...is to be able to be completely immersed in this moment.

And when we can do that over and over and over again...

...and live in this moment in a really high quality way...

...with a very amazing tone, if you will...

...that's when we get to be close to our potential.

And so a life or a professional career or a high performance career...

...is stringing together as many moments as possible...

...with high tone to them.

And are we able to be able to slip...

...into potentially something...

...where we can have an artistic expression with.

He drew-- He drew himself like you.

He says, "Well, this is better than the real Asano-san".

-Yeah. -Yeah.

He had-- He had some stubble at the back of it.

To me, Kazunori is a guy who-- Like I said, he's a perfectionist.

To make a mark in this world, I think that's what--

He's driven to do that.

I think he's already done that to a pretty--

To a point, with "Gran Turismo."

I don't think he's quite satisfied yet. He wants to....

I think he feels he's here for a reason...

...and, you know, it's up to him...

...to, you know, fulfill his destiny, if you-- If you will.

Do you remember where you were December 23rd, '97?

The Description of KAZ: Pushing The Virtual Divide - Gran Turismo Documentary (Full Movie)