Practice English Speaking&Listening with: Nissan researchers are changing the future of mobility

Normal
(0)
Difficulty: 0

DRIVING ELECTRIFICATION

DEVELOPING MOBILITY SERVICES

EXPANDING AI UTILIZATION

INNOVATING PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

CREATING NEW VALUES FOR

THE MOBILITY SOCIETY OF THE FUTURE

3D printing is rewriting the rules of car production.

I research and develop raw materials used in the process.

If the data is available, 3D printing can produce parts of any shape.

Depending on the part,

I can alter its strength by hardening here or softening there

or change the materials, such as by using aluminum or steel.

Parts form from multiple layers of metal powder.

Integrating separate parts, we reduce material use and weight.

Each grain of metal powder is finer than a strand of hair

but each is equally important for the integrity of the whole,

so I'm determined to develop powder of the highest quality.

I work on ASSB, the all-solid-state batteries used in next generation EVs.

Most EVs use lithium-ion batteries.

The electrolyte inside them is liquid

whereas ASSB electrolytes are solid.

ASSB can use more energy in a smaller volume,

which we expect will lead to a dramatic increase in EV driving range

and a reduction in charging times.

I'm testing various prototypes to see if they meet these expectations.

To explore the potential of ASSB,

I'm studying at Purdue University in the U.S.

as part of Nissan's overseas training program for young researchers.

My research team focuses on the inner workings

of the battery and its possibilities.

I report to Yoshino-san at the Nissan Research Center

and the simulation results are applied during the battery design stage.

We stay in regular contact as we conduct

our respective research activities.

I want to change the EV landscape with next-gen. batteries.

Nissan Research Center provides great opportunities

for young employees, including overseas assignments.

I love making a tangible difference in ways that only I can.

The Description of Nissan researchers are changing the future of mobility