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Practice English Speaking&Listening with: participial phrases

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in this video I'll show you how to use

participial phrases as adjectives in

sentences

I can smell the chicken it is roasting

in the oven so we have two sentences

here I could take this period off and

then remove the subject and the helping

verb in that second sentence and here

then begins the participial phrase

roasting in the oven this is the present

participle it begins the phrase and this

describes the word chicken you can also

write the sentence like this chicken

roasting in the oven smells good

so here the participial phrases in the

middle of the sentence roasting in the

oven describes the word chicken this is

the subject and the verb is smells not

roasting this is not the verb for the

subject this is why it's so important to

understand how participial phrases work

here are two sentences there is a woman

she is waiting in the car we can put

these two sentences together and form

the present participle here to describe

the woman by removing the subject and

that helping verb is so now the sentence

reads like this there's a woman waiting

in the car this is the participial

phrase and all of this describes the

woman the verb wait is a regular verb

here it is in a simple form weighted is

the past tense weighted is the past

participle and waiting is the present

participle you could also rewrite the

sentence like this there's a woman who

is waiting in the car in that case this

would be the relative clause describing

woman

blow is the simple form of the verb blue

is the past tense blown is the past

participle and blowing is the present

participle look at those trees they are

blowing in the wind so we can remove

this subject and this helping bird and

keep the main verb now it's in the form

of present participle and this phrase

blowing in the wind describes the word

trees look at those trees blowing in the

wind

I received a letter it was written by a

friend of mine

this is the simple form of the verb this

is the past tense this is the past

participle and this is the present

participle

if we take off it and was then we're

left with the past participle this

begins the participial phrase and this

describes the word letter I received a

letter written by a friend of mine or we

can go back and add in that this pronoun

and was to create a relative clause that

would describe though the word letter so

now we have a clause I received a letter

that was written by a friend of mine or

again just take this off and now you

have the participial phrase I received a

letter written by a friend of mine

here's the verb steel in the simple form

Stowell is the past tense stolen is the

past participle and stealing is the

present participle in this example I'll

show you how to use the word stolen to

form the participial phrase they found

the money it was stolen from the bank if

we remove this subject and this verb

this helping verb this is passive voice

the sentence now sounds like this they

found the money stolen from the bank

here's the participle phrase this is the

past participle to begin the phrase and

stolen from a bank describes the word

money you can also form a relative

clause by using the pronoun that and

then just return the verb and now this

becomes a sentence that uses a relative

clause they found the money that was

stolen from the bank or if it's easier

just take this off and then you have

participial phrase and white or light

colored pieces go first

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you

The Description of participial phrases