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Hi. Welcome to my youtube channel Pyrography Made Easy.

I'm Brenda

In this tutorial episode I'm going to explain

how to create the Mandala II artwork I did.

I thought this one turned out much better than my first attempt.

When I create mandala art I do a test burn to try out different pen tips, burn techniques,

and any ideas that I can think of.

So let me show you a photo of my test burn.

After I'm done with the test burn,

I take the parts that I like best and I put them together in the final artwork.

I highly recommend doing a test burn as it is a lot of fun.

You know, I think I actually enjoy the test burn more than I do creating the final artwork.

Anyway, during the tutorial there will be terms that I use like pull-away strokes.

If you are unfamiliar with my terminology,

in the comments below I put a link to a tutorial that explains them.

Also, there is a written tutorial and a pattern on my website for this artwork.

The written tutorial will cover a few items

that I'm not going to cover in here like prepping the wood.

Instead we will start after the trace lines have been burned in.

Let's get to work

Burn along the outer edge of the circle.

Then fill the circle with concentric rows of tailed dots or really small pull-away strokes.

Then darkly burn along the edges of the spokes

using the razor edge of the shader.

Fill in the spokes so they are dark brown and uniform in color.

Edge the cat eyes in the center of the petals,

so they are dark brown to black in color.

Then fill in the center of the cat eyes to a medium tan color.

Switch to a ball pen tip or a writer pen tip

and create a line of dark dots along the edge of the petal.

Next, draw thin tails or lines that

start on the dot and in near the cat eye.

With the petal end, use a knife tip to

fill it with thin dark curving lines.

Knife tips are also known as rounded heels, skews, or points.

If you don't have anything like that

then use the razor edge of the shader or a writer pin tip.

Switch to a shader and use the razor edge

to re-burn along the base of the lines where they touch the dots.

This will add a touch of shading to help the petal in look curved or rounded.

With the thread spools. darkly burn along their outer edges.

Then burn pull away strokes along the right edge of the spools.

Start the stroke on the edge of the spool

and pull it towards the center of the spool.

Let the strokes fade away just before the halfway mark.

Notice how I repeatedly burn over the area to eliminate individual stroke marks.

This is the key to getting smooth looking results.

Lastly, burn pull away strokes along the left edge of the spools

Start the stroke on the edge and pull it towards the center

Again, letting the stroke fade near the halfway mark.

When you are done the spools will have very dark sides

that fade the tan in the center.

The combination of contrast and gradient color will make the spools look rounded

To create the cones

burn pull-away strokes along the right edge.

As you burn the strokes, vary where the stroke ends,

or, put another way, vary the length of the strokes.

Some strokes I burned very short and others almost reached the opposite edge.

With the cones, I was after a little more texture and tonal variety,

so I didn't try to make the sides really smooth looking like I did with the spools.

Repeat this same process of burning pull away strokes along the left edge of the cones.

Darkly edged the ovals in the center of the dotted disk.

Fill the ovals with a dark brown color that fades a touch in the center.

Switch to a large ball pen tip and burn a row of dots near the outer edge of the disc.

Start the row at the apex or top of the disk and make this first dot the largest.

The dot size is controlled by how long you hold the pen tip to the wood.

Barely touching the wood with the pen tip will result in a small dot,

but holding the pen tip in place for half a second or so will produce much larger dots.

Burn smaller dots that are similar in size along the curve of the disk.

Use the ball pen tip to draw lines from each dot that head towards the center oval.

If you want the lines to be dark,

then re-burn over them until the desired darkness level is achieved.

With the framed diamonds,

use a knife tip to burn curved lines in them.

Again, if you don't have this type of pen tip use the razor edge of a shader or a writer pen tip.

Darkly burn a line along the edges of the diamonds.

I'm using the razor edge of the shader for this but you can also use a knife tip.

Next, burn pale pull-away strokes along the frame.

Start the stroke on the dark line around the diamond,

and then pull the stroke towards the outer edge of the frame.

Burn a dark thick line along the bottom of each triangle.

Then use pull away strokes too darkly burn along the right edge of each triangle.

Rotate the wood, as needed,

to keep the pen tip and optimal position

as this will keep your edges sharp.

Lastly, burn pull-away strokes along the left side of each triangle.

Burn darkly along the edges of the circles.

It is easier to burn the circles in sections

versus trying to burn them in one long continuous line.

I also find that it is quicker to burn the same section of all of the circles,

rotate the board, and then burn in another section on the circles.

Leave the center of the circles unburned.

Darkly burn along the outer edges of the curved triangles.

Next, fill in each triangle with leather texture.

Leather textures created by burning rows dark blotches that slightly touch.

You control how dark the blotches are by how long you hold the pen tip in on the wood.

Now I want to point out as I was creating the leather texture

I realized that I should have burned the small triangles below this area

a shade or two lighter because they are barely noticeable.

So I would recommend if you do this, make your little triangles paler.

Use the shader to lightly burn around the circles.

Leave the center very pale so the circles will look like rounded or domed bumps.

Switch to a writer pen tip and adjust the heat setting on your burner to low.

REALLY LOW

Use the pen tip to emboss or engrave deep parallel lines along the pointed border.

The heat will allow the pen to penetrate the wood easier without adding any color.

Now I must warn you

that this technique puts a lot of pressure on the pen tip.

Depending on the style of your writer pen tip,

this technique can damage the tip.

During a test burn I used Colwood's old style writer pen tip

and I bent the tip to a 90 degree angle

Oops!

The current style I'm using in this video is much sturdier, and I didn't have any issues with it

To finish the pointed border first burn a dark line along the edges

Then use the flat of the shader and burn over the border to reveal the embossed lines.

Begin with the cat eyes in the center of the pitted oval.

Burn dark pull-away strokes along the edges of the cat eyes.

Start the stroke on the outer edge and pull it towards the center.

Burn one side on all of the eyes, and then, if needed,

rotate the wood and burn the other side.

Leave a thin sliver along the center of each eye unburned.

With the second cat eye, burn pull away strokes along the outer edge.

Let the strokes fade when you reach the center cat eye.

Use a micro pen tip to emboss rows of dots along the curving lines on the ovals.

Set your burner to a really low heat as the goal is to use the heat to help the pin dig into the wood

without adding any color in the process.

For reference, my burner goes up to 10 and I had it set on 0.5 during this step.

Also, you may find it helpful to draw in guidelines with a pencil like I did.

There are quite a few ovals,

and this technique uses a lot of pressure on the pen tip.

My hand got very fatigued during this process.

To remedy this

take a break or switch hands.

I wanted to get this done as soon as I could so I switched hands.

Erase any pencil marks

and use the shader to burn pull away strokes along the inner edge of the ovals.

Start the stroke at the edge of the cat eye and pull it towards the outer edge of the oval.

Keep the strokes in the tan color range

that fade away near the center of the oval.

I find it is much easier to pull the strokes towards me,

so I rotate the wood as needed to allow this to happen

Burn pull-away strokes along the outer edge of the ovals.

Start these strokes on the oval edge and pull them towards the oval center.

These pull away strokes should be in the brown color range when they start,

and fade to light tan near the end of the stroke.

I decided that the inner cat eyes needed to be darker,

so I reburned over all of them.

If you are happy with how yours,

then omit this step.

Burn darkly along the edge of the ovals in the elegant pods.

Yes, I know some of the names I chose for these objects aren't the best,

but I had to call them something.

Use a white charcoal pencil and draw curling lines on the pod.

I must emphasize the need to use charcoal and not colored pencils!

We will be burning over these lines,

and the oils and waxes in colored pencils will melt and char on the wood.

Charcoal, on the other hand, will resist the heat of the pen.

I prefer to use white charcoal because it's easier to see after I've burned over it.

As you draw the curling lines on the pods,

vary the sides and the direction of the lines.

Switch to a writer pen tip and burn a dark line along the right edge of the curling lines.

Burn the lines only in areas of cast shadows.

Let me explain.

Visualize the Sun being in the upper left corner of the art,

and the curling lines are raised walls that rise up from the surface of the wood.

As the Sun strikes the walls it will cast shadows onto the ground behind them.

We are burning in those shadows.

Use a shader pen tip to burn darkly along the outer edges of the pods

Don't worry too much about burning over the charcoal lines.

Then, burn over the rest of the pot until it is tan in color,

but now try to avoid burning over the charcoal lines.

The reason is that we want the lines to be as pale as possible for good contrast.

Since the charcoal only resists the heat,

we have to avoid burning over these lines otherwise the oven underlying wood will darken some.

After you have burned in all of the pods erase all of the charcoal lines.

Use a pencil to draw grid lines in the ovals.

Then use a writer pen tip to burn in those lines

I have found that it was faster to burn in all of the vertical lines,

and then burn in all of the horizontal lines or vice versa.

The repetitive motion of burning lines in the same direction creates a

creates a rhythm in your brain and the more you do it,

the less you have to think about it and the faster it goes.

Switching directions forces your brain to pause and re-adjust, so that slows you down we

We will be turning the grid into a basket weave pattern.

Start by using a shader pen tip to burn along the right side of

every other square in the first column of the grid.

Then burn short pull-away strokes along the right side of every other square in that grid.

Pull the strokes horizontally across the square.

Do the same thing with the second column,

but start on a different square.

Pick one either a row above or below the first square

in the first column.

With the third column,

burn in the squares on the same row as the first column.

Continue this process of alternating the starting point until all of the columns have been burned.

Rotate the wood then burn the pull-away strokes on the left

(well now the right)

of each square that was burned in before.

When you are done you will have a grid

filled with alternating blank and curved looking squares.

Fill in the empty squares with pull away strokes,

but this time burn the strokes in a vertical or up-down direction.

When you are done

the oval will have a basket weave texture on it.

Use a knife tip to burn lots of thin curved lines on the cat eye.

With the round circle burn thin lines that radiate straight out from the cat eye,

and then curve upward towards the circle edges.

It might be easier to pencil in guidelines to follow on this step.

Just remember to erase the pencil marks after you're done.

Burn-in thin curved lines on the split cat eye above the elegant pods

Use pull away strokes to burn along the top and bottom of the circle behind the split cat eye.

Leave the center considerably paler to give the circle around it look.

Darkly burn along the edges of the split cat eyes located between the pods.

Use short dark pull-away strokes along the edges leaving the center pale.

Burn a thick line along the edge of the circle

Then burn short pull-away strokes along the edge.

Start the stroke on the edge and pull it towards the cat eye.

Lightly burn along the edges of the inner cat eye.

And lastly lightly burn along the seam where the circle and the cat eye touch.

Use pull-away strokes along the top and bottom of the center cat eye above the pod.

Lightly burn along the edges of the split cat eyes above the pods,

and then darkly burn the top and bottom of the small circles above them.

Leave a thin line in the middle of the circle much paler than the top and the bottom.

With the three stacked circles from the top and bottom of each one.

Again leave a thin pale line along the center of each circle.

I find that it is quicker to burn all of the tops, or bottoms, before burning the opposite side

We are all done.

I truly hope that you will try and create the artwork yourself.

If you do don't be afraid to let your creativity out.

My tutorials are intended to be guidelines nothing more.

You can replicate what I'm doing or alter it to suit your preferences.

In the remarks below I provided a link to my website:

Pyrography Made Easy

The website has the written tutorial in the free pattern for this artwork

Well thank you for watching.

if you've enjoyed the video please subscribe to my channel

I have a new video every Tuesday.

and at least once a month, if not more often, I post a tutorial video

We'll see you next week.

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