Practice English Speaking&Listening with: Philippines Invests in a School for Super Maids

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Mia Faustino quit her job as a telephone operator at an insurance company

to learn how to use a vacuum cleaner, make the bed in record time

and fry eggs in just the right amount of oil.

Like her classmates, every morning Mia goes to TESDA,

an educational institute paid for by the government where thousands of Filipinos

are trained in skills that will help them find a job abroad as a domestic servant.

My name is Mia Faustino, I am 27 years old,

I graduated from a 1 year course in computer vocational training.

The reason I've enrolled here in TESDA is because I am planning to go abroad

maybe to Europe, or America, or Asia.

I work in other offices where they offer very low salaries.

The idea to create a school for domestic workers was first put forward during the summer of 2006

by the president of the Philipines, Gloria Arroyo.

The Philippine economy depends heavily on its emigrant workers

who make up for around 12 percent of GDP by sending money home.

One in every ten Filipinos works abroad.

The Government has worked out that every day on average

3377 Filipino nationals find work in other countries.

This training gives them the confidence to do the job properly,

since mainly we don't know how to work at home,

and it's the employers who are teaching them how to clean the house and everything.

They are not even familiar with the equipment, so when they go abroad

people, the employers, they get angry, they slap them, they even put irons,

hot flat irons on their arms... And so many things. Physical abuse, I can say.

In the Philippines there are very low salaries, and in other countries very high, sir.

Much supportive in family, sir, family needs.

Apart from basic household tasks, at TESDA the students also learn about first aid,

about what to do in case of a fire and relaxation techniques to ward off anxiety,

depression and loneliness.

For example, they are encouraged to do sports

and engage in recreational activities in the company of friends.

Think about when you last went on vacation.

If this was long time ago, you maybe are feeling run down or overstressed.

We encourage our Filipino workers to they have these qualifications,

they are certified and they can compete abroad.

We would also like other countries to know that we have competent and qualified workers,

in any kind of qualification.

Father, thank you so much for this wonderful day, and thank you for everything that we've learned.

The Philippines is possibly the only country in the world that accepts its role

as exporter of human labour without further ado.

The government tries to monitor and coordinate the activity of almost 1.3 million

Filipinos living abroad.

In fact, a government agency works with governments and companies across the globe

to offer Filipinos jobs in other countries.

In Manila, successive governments have recognized

the way emigration boosts the local economy

while easing the demographic pressure in a country with soaring birth rates

In some sectors the over representation of Philippine workers is staggering,

for instance one in every four sailors across the globe is a Filipino.

After eight hours of classes, the girls return home by public transport.

Mia lives more than half an hour from here,

in a marginal and badly constructed neighborhood,

although it's not one of the poorest in Manila.

My house is really empty, there are no kitchen appliances, there are no living room appliances.

My sister is a teacher, a school teacher.

This is my mom.

I don't have any choice but to work abroad.

The money that I can earn will really help my family.

Thanks to TESDA, Mia has learned to use domestic electronic appliances

and cleaning techniques that were never necessary in her own home.

If her dream comes true, she'll most certainly live surrounded by things which she never knew existed -

but it'll a long way away from her country and her family.

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