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Practice English Speaking&Listening with: Top 15 YouTubers Who've Done Horrible Things

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15.

Kanghua Ren Some YouTubers do heinous things for views.

Kanghua Ren is one of them.

The YouTuber, known as ReSet, has a million subscribers who tune in to see what mischief

and mayhem he can think up next.

But this time, his particular cruelty brought him face-to-face with a potential two-year

prison sentence.

The 20-year-old Chinese born YouTuber, based in Barcelona, filled Oreos with toothpaste

and gave them to a homeless man to eat.

The 52-year-old homeless man ate five of them.

After feeding the man with the tainted Oreos, ReSet seemed to understand that he was pushing

the boundaries of decency.

The video, viewed thousands of times, earned the YouTuber over2000, but may cost him

up to30,000 in compensation to the homeless man on top of a potential two-year prison

sentence.

The homeless man, identified as Gheorge L. said he became ill five minutes after eating

them.

14.

Hannah Sabata Heres an idea: if you rob a bank, dont

post about it on YouTube.

19-year-old YouTuber, Hannah Sabata, did and was shortly thereafter arrested on November

28th, 2012 for allegedly robbing a bank in Waco, Nebraska the previous day.

How were police so quick to catch her?

Well, for one thing, she uploaded a video of herself in which she was surrounded by

cash and boasting about what she did to the bank.

The self-titledChick Bank Robberwas quickly identified and sentenced to 10-20

years behind bars.

Thats a lot of time for a mere $6,000.

13.

Randy Robert Stair This man operated a YouTube channel called

Pioneers Productions.

There, he uploaded sketch videos, including collaborations with other content creators.

But his channel was rehashed in 2014, instead featuring an animated series called theEmbers

Ghost Squad.”

The channel took an even darker turn in June of 2017, when Stair uploaded his final video.

In the video, he declared his hatred toward those involved in the Nickelodeon animated

series, Danny Phantom, whose character, Ember McLain, is who the main character in EGS is

modeled after.

In the video, an animated version of himself and a character from his EGS series are depicted

taking the lives of students at a high school.

The 24-year-old proceeded to live his animated series by taking the lives of his coworkers

at a store in Weis Markets in Pennsylvania during his late-night shift.

He then took his own life.

It was truly a horrible event.

12.

Danh Van Le This man is a YouTuber who founded the channel

Trollstation.

The name of the channel says enough: Van Le is known for causing public hi jinx with the

intent to go viral.

But he bit off a bit more than he could chew in July of 2015, when his YouTube hi jinx

took him to two London galleries, where he and his pals pulled a heist prank.

While these videos were trolling, in reality, they were so believable that museum-goers

raced from the galleries in fear.

One visitor even fainted from the episode.

Due to this misbehavior, Van Le was taken to court and sentenced to 12 weeks behind

bars, while his pals received up to 20 weeks for intent to cause fear and provoking unlawful

violence.

Van Les trouble didnt end there.

He was also sentenced to 24 weeks for a fake briefcase bomb hoax.

Because of bail conditions, Van Les channel went dark in March of 2016.

The channel claimed they were taking the time tore-evaluatetheir influence.

Heres hoping they never pull any other pranks that could psychologically harm strangers.

11.

Logan Paul In one particularly controversial and notorious

video, Paul visited Aokigahara forest, where he shot footage of a man who had taken his

own life - an act that was considered seriously unethical.

However, this, alone, did not lead to charges being filed against him.

After watching Pauls videos, police in Japan say he could be charged with at least

four different crimes: destruction of property, public indecency, interference with business

operations, and traffic violations.

YouTube agrees that punishment is fitting.

They gave a statement, saying that they removed his channel from Google Preferred.

A former police detective is completely flabbergasted by Pauls actions.

In his own words: “Hes left video evidence, on his own YouTube channel.”

After the reviews of Pauls behavior started rolling in, he left YouTube for a while to

reflecton his behavior.

10.

Alvaro Castillo Nothing good comes from an obsession with

the events on April 20, 1999 in Columbine, Colorado, as YouTuber Alvaro Castillo demonstrated

when he attempted to copy their actions at his high school in August of 2006.

The young mans YouTube channel was not popular, with only 60 subscribers and a half

dozen or so video vlogs.

In the vlogs he expressed his love of movies like Predator and Natural Born Killers.

But he didnt go so far as to declare his desire to be either one of those things.

On the morning in question, Castillo took the life of his father and left a note.

He then headed to school with the intent to take more lives.

Armed to the teeth, Castillo marched into Orange High School.

Thankfully, he didnt manage to take any more lives, but he did seriously hurt two

students when he opened fire.

When he was brought to trial, the defense argued that Castillo was insane, and that

he thought that God ordered him to commit these actions.

Although judging by the videos he made, Castillo certainly was mentally disturbed, the defense

team wasnt able to prove insanity.

The event became even worse, as the 21-year-old barely reacted to the guilty verdict that

was read.

He was given life without parole.

He stated that he understood that hed hurt people with his actions, though he did not

intend to.

9.

DaddyOFive When parents decide to make child stars out

of their kids, things can either good or bad.

YouTuber DaddyOFive stepped over this line.

The owners of the channel, Heather and Michael Martin, who hailed from Maryland, often posted

controversial videos, as they used their five-kid family in YouTube pranks.

The charges in question are due to one prank the couple took out on their 9- and 11-year-olds,

Cody and Emma.

A neuropsychologist found that both children suffered frommental injury because of

the videotaping incidents and what went on during the videos.”

Their actions resulted in child neglect charges that sent them to probation after the couple

pleaded guilty.

They did so under the Alford plea, which allows them to maintain their position of innocence

while, at the same time, allowing that the evidence is stacked against them.

They expressed remorse and were given five yearsprobation.

The state attorneys chief stated: “The evaluations that were conducted of Heather

and Mike, obviously their judgement was somewhat warped in participating in these videos.

But there wasnt any intentmalicious intent to damage the children.”

Heres hoping this doesnt happen with any other YouTube child stars.

8.

LionMaker Although gaming YouTubers seem innocent enough,

they often pull in a large number of child fans.

And, in the wrong hands, with that can come inappropriate behavior.

LionMaker is accused of developing inappropriate relationships with child fans, even Tweeting

out images of one of these children.

In one tweet, he wrote: "I have fooled all of u and have made plenty of money while doing

it.”

LionMaker quickly removed the tweets, but many of his followers saw them, leading to

an investigation into the 27-year-old Belgian YouTuber who goes by the real name of Marcus

Wilton.

At the time of his exchanges, Wilton boasted 200+ million views through his personal commentary

gameplay videos.

Every day, he chatted with his teen and pre-teen fans over group Skype for hours.

Those in the conversations noted that the normally upbeat YouTuber would sometimes reveal

a different side, declaring himself mentally unstable or ranting on about this or that.

It may come as no surprise then that this behavior led the YouTuber to preying on the

now 16-year-old girl, whose Twitter persona wasPaige Thepanda”.

The family has taken police action against LionMaker, with one member saying that the

girl has been badly affected by everything thats unfolded and may even be brainwashed.

All we want is to protect her and keep her from meeting up with him, but we can't

watch her all the time,” the girls family said.

Wilton, who has yet to be formally charged for his actions, may be aiming at making a

comeback.

His YouTube channel, which had gone dark around June 2016, suddenly came back to life in November

2017 with a replacement star - someone by the name of THExSERGEANT.

The newbie wrote in a comment on one of his videos, claiming that LionMaker would soon

return.

If he does return, parents beware.

7.

Jared Lee Loughner When Jared Loughner became a YouTuber, he

began spreading theories that would take a dark turn.

Though he had a small audience, his view counts was up there.

With disturbing videos that focused on the government, mind tricks, religion, and a currency

he invented, Loughner was clearly off his rocker.

But it wasnt completely clear just how far he would go.

That is, until January of 2011, when he opened fire on a political rally in Arizona, taking

the lives of six and hurting many more, including U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords, who

was his target.

Instead, he took the lives of a nine year old and Chief U.S. District Court Judge John

Roll, while Giffords miraculously survived.

Loughner pleaded guilty, for which he was given life behind bars - plus 140 years.

6.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev The man responsible for the events at the

Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, allegedly had a YouTube channel.

Although Tsarnaev never uploaded videos to his channel, he did follow, like, and comment

upon several questionable videos.

The account has been active since August 2012, long before he became infamous for the events

that took the lives three people and harmed several hundred during the Boston Marathon.

The 26-year-old brother had his life taken during a police standoff, while his younger

brother, was found hiding out in a boat.

The younger brother was questioned and confessed that he and his brother wanted revenge for

events in Iraq and Afghanistan.

He was convicted of thirty charges on April 8, 2015.

5.

Pekka-Eric Auvinen This troubled 18-year-old took his anger to

school in Finland on November 7th, 2007 and took the lives of eight people.

His online persona explained the mentality behind such a horrific act.

He owned two YouTube accounts, using the aliases NaturalSelector 89 and Sturmgeist89.

Under these accounts, he posted videos of historically horrible events.

He also appeared in at least one of his videos, in which he demonstrated his piece by shooting

apples.

A final post was uploaded on the day of his attack.

The video showed photos of himself, filtered red, along with a pic of his high school.

Then, on the day in question, He entered the school and took the lives of eight and hurt

an additional thirteen, before taking his own life.

4.

Nasim Aghdam On April 3, 2018, 38-year-old Nasim entered

YouTubes headquarters in San Bruno, California through an exterior parking garage.

Once inside the outdoor patio area, the animal rights activist opened fire, hurting three

and then taking her own life.

Nasim, an Iranian immigrant, protested with PETA against the US Marine Corps using pigs

during training procedures and posted content that aligned with her beliefs, some of which

went viral in Iran.

An investigation by San Bruno police uncovered rants by the woman on YouTube, where Nasim

alleges that the site suppresses certain videos and prevents traffic.

According to a 2014 FBI study, Nasim was one out of only six sole-females to commit an

act like this.

3.

Anthony Powell YouTube ranter, Anthony Powell, was the embodiment

of the worst of YouTube.

He uploaded videos to his channel under the name Tony48219 about his dislike for women.

As with any extreme viewpoint, his ideas found a following.

But this success was short-lived, when his words turned into action on Good Friday in

2009.

This is when the 28-year-old YouTuber and student of the MacKenzie Fine Arts Center

at Henry Ford Community College arrived at school with a mission to take a life.

He targeted fellow student and YouTuber, 20-year-old Asia McGowan, taking her life, after which

he took his own.

As Powell stated in his videos, he was atrue Christian.”

He likely saw himself as a man sent here to rid the world of atheists, whom he called

the devils troopersandfilthy animals.”

The onlydevils trooperI see here is Powell, himself.

2.

Elliot Rodger Some YouTubers use the site as their online

confessional.

Thats what this YouTuber did right before he went on to take the lives of six people

and harm many more in Isla Vista, California.

This all happened on May 23, 2014.

Before the spree, Rodger uploaded a YouTube video, entitled, “Elliot Rodger's Retribution,”

in which he told the world why hed reached his breaking point.

He blamed it all on girls rejecting him, and being ignored by the popular kids at school.

In the video, he said: "You've forced me to suffer all my life and now I'll force you

all to sufferHe said he wanted to annihilate them, and

to give themwhat they deserve.”

The very next day, he stayed true to these words.

He took the lives of three men at his home, took the lives of three women in front of

a sorority house, as well as another man at a deli.

In the end, Rodger, took his own life, ending the annihilation where it began.

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1.

Anders Breivik Yet another person who espoused his horrific

beliefs on YouTube just hours before committing one of the most horrible acts Norway has ever

seen.

Anders Breivik uploaded his manifesto in a video, which was later quickly removed from

YouTube.

In the manifesto, he says: “The first drop of rain marks the coming of a great and unstoppable

cultural conservative tidal wave.

The tidal wave will cleanse Western EuropeHe imagined a Europe based on similar nationalism

and cultural conservatism seen in nations like South Korea and Japan.

After posting the video, in Oslo, Norways capital, he took the lives of eight people.

While chaos ensued, he traveled to Utøya island, where the Workers Youth League

held a camp.

There, dressed as a police officer, he took the lives of 69 children.

The man was sentenced to containment, a prison sentence that can be suspended indefinitely,

with a minimum time of ten years.

This is the harshest penalty available in Norway.

Considering the devastation Breivik caused, some believe it isnt harsh enough.

The Description of Top 15 YouTubers Who've Done Horrible Things