Practice English Speaking&Listening with: 1.17.2021 | Jazz, Spirituals, Prayer and Protest Concert: Peacefully protesting as we come togeth...

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The most important discussion that we have to have is that all people

deserve to be free and so the discussion has to be about equality and freedom and justice

this video is important for the College of Music primarily because it makes a statement

that we're committed to equality and freedom for all and that Black Lives Matter.

I think that it isimportant during these times

that we enlist alliesbecause how things have always changed in Americais when people stand together

not black against white but black and white against racial injusticeand inequality

the thing about musicians is that we exist together much more than we exist apart

I am so much stronger with Rodney at my side than I am by myself in a room

and as I communicate that togetherness we hope our audiences startto look around them and see how can we be more

together and less apart

people need to know that they're not alone

when you feel like there's support from an organization that you belong toand that everyone may not be coming from the same

place and understand all of the struggles that we each have we recognize that we do have

struggles and feeling that support from your college or university is I thinkextremely valuable

for me it's been valuable to to see a lot of the people around the world

fighting for the same things that I'm fighting for

you know and it gives you strength

I think it's important that people see us the faculty

performing doing what we do what we choose to perform is really important it sets an example and

it exposes them to music they might not otherwise or this is what I hope to do is expose my students

music they might not otherwise come across

wellI think messages like this and performances like this send a strong message to our students and to our community our alumni and our faculty

that we hear the voices of the needed when we hear the voices of those who have been

disproportionately affected by injustices in thiscountry

I think collectively as a faculty and as artists ourselves we won't stand by and listento this quietly we're going to use our voice

and our platform as artists and as educators and as citizens and members of the community

to letfolks know that times are ready to change and they need to change they've been ready for a long time

Hello and welcome to our broadcast of "Jazz Spirituals Prayer and Protest"

a rebroadcast of our 2019 event with new features celebrating the lifeof Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Im Jim Forger, Dean of the College of Music at Michigan State University

for the past 41 years MSU has honored the legacy of Dr. King

this is the 35th year since the first national MLK holiday took place in January 1986

the legacy of Dr. King is of a man who became the seminal leader in the United States

in advancing civil rights through non-violence and civil disobedience during a particularly turbulent time

today our college joins the MSU Office of Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives

in recognizing through our MLK day celebration the honorable John Lewis

it is an understatement to say that 2020 was a turbulent year it was marked by great challenge and turmoil

starting with a debilitating pandemic thatrestructured our days and continues to claiman unprecedented number of lives

remarkablepolitical divisions have brought tremendousstrife

interfering with our ability to address the crucial needs of our nation

woven through it all were the tragic deaths of George Floyd, Brianna Taylor, Ahmad Arbory, and more

which awakened many to the deep and pervasive racism that continues to infect American society

this profound stain on our Nation resultsin brutal and unspeakable violence and itwas underscored in 2020 in painful detail

in the midst of this turmoil the UnitedStates and the world lost John Lewis

anotherchampion of the civil rights movement known asthe Conscience of the Congress

a towering figurewho continued the work of his friend mentor andcolleague Dr. King

Lewis was also an apostle ofnon-violence

we had the pleasure of at least two visits by Dr. Louis to East Lansing and we will hear some of his comments during this broadcast

John Lewis said that it was Dr. King who provided the teaching, the tactics, and the philosophy

and thatKing led the movement that showed quote

"the way of peace the way of love and the way of non-violence"

always an optimist Mr. Lewis embraced Dr. King's teachings and urged us to be persistent and constant in the quest for justice

he said quote "never give up never give in keep the faith and keep your eye on the prize"

he reminded us that quote "the struggle to create a truly multi-racial society

will not take one day one month or one year it is a struggle of a lifetime" he said

and of course he famously summarized his call to action as "gettinginto good trouble"

today I sense a renewed focus on stirring up some "good trouble" and it is a sourceof optimism

including the promise of getting a vaccine throughout the world and on the way toour university community

and I appreciate the savvy and science-based decision-making at MSU and within the state of Michigan

at the same time the crucial business of fighting racism by advancingprogress in diversity equity and inclusion

has benefited from a new and collaborative focus from Central University Leadership Interim and

new inclusion and intercultural initiatives leadership and an effective steering committee

our thanks to Deborah Johnson for her leadership a sincere welcome to Jabar Bennett

and our appreciation to Luis Garcia and Wanda Lipscomb for their work with the steering committee

for me one of the greatest sources of optimism and revelation relating to issues of diversity

equity inclusion and belonging has come from recent student activism

let me give a shout out to all MSU students who work as activists in intercultural initiatives

but i'd like to take this opportunity to acknowledge and thank a stronggroup of music student activists

their bravery,

their commitment, persistence and their understandable demands

have made them effective partners to create change

this group calledColor Me Music: Alliance for Students of Color

was founded in 2019 by two graduate students, Jordan Davis and Jadrian Tarver

from the start their goals have been to develop community for students of color and others

to create a safe place for dialogue to create aplatform for performers and composers of color

and to bring change to the college of music curriculum and culture

in short, they want to create an inclusive place where allbelong

Jadrian and Jordan organized a listening session with members of Color Me Music myself and Senior Associate Dean David Rayl

our role as allies was simply to listen without comment which was not an easy task on this occasion

occasion these undaunted students took a page from Mr. Lewis and stirred up some good trouble

they raised a number of serious concerns and shared their perspectives about our college's climate,

culture, curriculum, and the issue of belongingor not belonging

their frank direct insights made it clear that our administration neededto be better listeners and collaborators

we look back on this initial meeting and the many that have followed as an opportunity

to engage beyond conversation and to include more tangible action

these student leaders Jordan Davis and Jadrian Tarver

and their colleagues Sequoia Snyder, Jeremiah Flack, Phoenix Miranda and Sean Holland III

have met with college administrators, faculty,

and other guests weekly since June to bring a variety of positive and important changes

in fact this group was responsible for curating the content you are about to see and to hear

so on this day celebrating the life of Dr. Martin LutherKing Jr

with special recognition of the lifelong sacrifice and accomplishments

of the honorable John Lewis

I am humbled and proud to single out Color Me Music and their leaders

they don't give up and they don't give in

they keep the faith and they keep their eye on the prize

they make a difference for this college and for this university and I believe they

will make an enormous difference in communities across this nation, after they graduate

they cause me to be hopeful and optimistic and I am gratefulfor their partnership and for their leadership

I thank them and I thank you for being with us for this special MLK day celebration

good afternoon Spartan community wherever you may be in this moment

Welcome visitors and listeners and those celebrating Martin Luther Kingand John Lewis today

I am Deborah Johnson director of the diversity research network in the office

for inclusion and intercultural initiatives and I'm so pleased to be here with you for this16th year of

Jazz Spirituals Prayer and Protests sponsored by the College of Music and the Office for Inclusion

this wonderful event is delivered under the guidance of Rodney Whitaker University distinguished Professor

Professor of Jazz Directorof Diversity and inclusion

Jim Forger Dean of the College of Music and Michael Sunderman and so many other talented students professors

and music professionals in our midst all gathered on this occasion of remembrance and celebration

the theme this year is 'good trouble' inspired by the decades-long contributions of the honorable

John Lewis a U.S Congressman and sterling leader of the Civil Rights Movement and of humanity

I'm a child of the 60s and as such I remember Dr. King quite well his words were sacred as in

so many African-American homes of the time in my grandmother's house upon a prominent wall

hung the trilogy of photo images John and Bobby Kennedy and Martin at the apex

as in my life King was an inspiration to John Lewis who made hard decisions consequential decisions

to follow the non-violent path of King to achieve voting and human rights for African Americans

but indeed for many marginalized peoples and communities these were the decisions that he

encouraged all of us to embrace

he encouragedus to act on freedom on a moral righteousness

he said when you see something that is not right not fair not just you have to speak up

you have to say something you have to do something get into trouble he encouraged

get into good trouble necessary trouble

like King he believed in love as a powerful tool of change

he often remarked we are one people with one family we must find a way to say

lay down the burden of hate we must love for hate is too heavy a burden to bear

John wrapped the struggle in stories of humor to ease the way

this you will see as his words and the music unfold today

john lewis left us with so many words of hope solace and inspiration

as well as encouragement to make some noise and get in the way and ultimately to continue a legacy of good trouble

remembering that the long game of our struggle as a people is the struggle of a lifetime

John didn't speak of music except to say that the reward for playing jazz is playing jazz

*that's for Rodney*

Martin on the other hand spoke eloquently of music and its ability to speak to

people's oppression and the human experience of suffering and underscoring in his eloquence the

power of music to reside in protest he said that music is protest but also inspiration

the voice of the oppressed it is solace hope healing and the beauty we need to remain a humankind

for our audience today I wish you to experience each of these transformations

stories and messages the music holds allow me to say this before getting on to our concert

in a time that has often been marred by separation loss difference and struggle today we especially

remember that John was an optimist reminding us let no person or any force dampen dim or diminishyour light

so let this music once again lift us bind us together as community heal our spirits and

move us toward hope and most of all celebration of what is possible

thank you and enjoy

hi my name is Jadrian Tarver I'm a third-year doctoral candidate and I serve as project manager

for diversity equity inclusion and belonging with the college of music and Wharton Arts Center

also I'm the co-founder of Color Me Music a student organization at the College ofMusic

today I would like to share with you a brief history of Lift Every Voice and seeing

activists and poet James Weldon Johnson pinned to Lift Every Voice and Sing in 1900 originally

a poem for Abraham Lincoln's birthday it was later set to music by his brother composer

John Roseman Johnson the first performance of this anthem was sung by 500 school children including

Edwin Stanford school in Jacksonville where James Weldon Johnson served as principal

in 1919 the national association for the advancement of colored people the NAACP dubbed

Lift Every Voice and seeing the negro national hymn or the negro national anthem James Weldon

Johnson was the executive secretary at that time today it is known as the black national anthem

for me Lift Every Voice and seeing is a sunk of protest hope faith resilience perseverance and

a prayer of thanksgiving it invokes the essence of the black experience in America and the experience

of other marginalized groups so today I charge you to Lift Your Voice against social injustice

I charge you to lift your voice for freedom and liberty for all I charge you to lift your voice

to sing to earth and heaven ring ring with the harmonies of liberties lift every voice and sing

good evening

I must tell you that I'm delighted very happy and very pleased to be here

I want to thank the provost the president the mayor to each and

every one of you the library director all of the wonderful and good people of East Lansing

thank you you didn't have to do it but you did it I feel so at home I feel

more than lucky but very blessed to be here I grew up in rural Alabama about 50 miles from Montgomery

outside of a little place called Troy it is true that my father was a sharecropper a teenage farmer

but in 1944 when I was only four years old and I do remember when I was only four

how many of you remember when you was four what happened to the rest of us

my father had saved three hundred dollars and with the three hundred dollars

he bought a 110 acres of land my family still owned this land today

on this farm we raised a lot of cotton and coin peanuts hogs cows and chickens

I don't eat too many peanuts today I ate so many peanuts when I was growing up I just

don't want to see no more peanuts sometime I would get on a flight flying from Atlanta to

Washington or Washington back to Atlanta and the flight attendant tried to offer me some peanuts

I said no thank you I don't care if any peanuts but you heard me say on that farm to raise a

lot of chickens do any of you know anything about raising chickens no you don't don't try to fool me

as a little boy it's my responsibility to care for the chickens and I fell in

love with raising chickens like no one else grade chickens when the setting hand was set

to take the fresh eggs mark them with a pencil

place them under the sitting hand and wait for three long weeks for the little tricks to hatch

some of you may be saying that John Lewis why don't you mark the stretcher with a pencil before

you place them under the setting hand well from time to time another hand we get on that same nest

and there will be some more eggs some more fresh eggs you have to baby cheer the fresh eggs from

the eggs that were already under the setting in do you follow me you don't follow me stop fooling me

so when these little chicks were hatched about food he said he means I would cheat on

these setting hands I would take these little chicks and put them in a box with a lantern

raise them on their own get some more fresh eggs mark it with a pencil place the money they're

sitting here encouraged to sit in here in the stone and that's for another three weeks kept on

fooling and cheating on you sitting there it's not the right thing to do it was not a moral thing to

do it's not the most loving thing to do it was not the most non-violent thing to do it was not the

most democratic thing to do but I was never quite able to save 18.98 to order the most inexpensive

incubator a hashtag from the robux store are any old enough to remember the system about catalog

that the big book the heavy book that thick book some people call it the ordering book some

people call it the wish book I wish I had this I wish they had that so I just kept on wishing

that little boy about eight and a half or nine years old I wanted to be a minister I

wanted to preach the gospel so with the help of my brothers and sisters and my cousins

we would gather all of our chickens together in the chicken yard

and my brothers and sisters and cousins were lined the outside of the chicken yard

but along with the chicken it helped make up the audience the congregation and I would start

preaching speaking and when I look back on some of these chickens or by their heads

some of the chicken will shake their heads they never quite said amen

but I'm convinced that some of those chickens that I preached it in the 40s and the 50s

tended to listen to me much better than some of my colleagues listen to me today in the congress

thank you are you all having a good time so far all right how about keeping your

hands together for miss Izzy Daley and James Carter Graham on the piano

don't know why

there's no sun up in the sky stormy weather since my men and I ain't together

it keeps raining all the time

just can't get my poor self together

when he went away the blues walked in and met me

if he stays away old rocking chair will get me all I do is pray the lord above will let me

walk in the sun once more can't go on everything I had is gone stormy weather

just can't get my poor self together

keeps raining all the time it keeps raining all the time

I walk around heavy hearted and sad night comes around and I'm still

feeling bad rain pouring down blinding every hope I had this bittering battering beading and

splattering drives me mad love love love love this misery is just too much for me

you can't go on

keeps raining all the time keeps raining all the time

time

when you're down and out

when you're on the street when evening falls so hard

I will comfort you

I'll take your when times are rough

and friends just the bridge over troubled water I will lay me down

I will lay me down

sail on silver girl

sail on by your time has come to shine all your dreams are on your way see how they shine

when times

like a bridge over troubled water I will lay me down

like a bridge over troubled water I will you down

I will let me down

I will let me down

how about another round of applause for Coty Morris

and I remember as a little child when my uncles and aunts and first cousins

will come south to visit us

with their new cars their fine clothes they will come from buffalo they will come from detroit

and I remember with some of my cousins going out into the woods trying to slow down

a large pine tree and we were going to make a bus and use the big part of the pine tree to make

wheels and we were going to roll out of Alabama it just didn't work but I also remember in 1951

11 years old that one of my uncles his wife and some of my cousins

invited me to travel back to buffalo with them and I can recall my mother

my aunt my mother sister staying up at night cooking cakes and pies frying chicken

and placing it in shoe boxes and brown paper bags in order for us to have something to eat

while we were taking that long trip from rural Alabama to Buffalo New York

you couldn't stop in Alabama you couldn't stop in Tennessee or Kentucky we can only

stop where we arrived in Ohio so in the real sense Buffalo New York taught me

a lesson that I saw black people and white people living side by side I saw a different world

I saw an elevator for the first time an escalator for the first time

and I went back as a young child bike to rural Alabama more determined to bring down those signs

that I saw signs saying white waiting colored waiting white men colored men white women colored

women and on a Saturday afternoon when people go to the theater all of us look like children had to

go upstairs to the balcony and all of the little white children went downstairs to the first floor

I kept asking my mother my father my grandparents my great-grandparents why

why and they said that's the way it is don't get in the way don't get in trouble

but in 1955 I heard about rosa parks heard the words of Martin Luther King Jr on our radio

and the words and action of Rosa Parks and the words and leadership of Dr King inspired me

to find a way to get in the way I found a way to get in trouble and I got in good trouble

necessary trouble I didn't like segregation I didn't like racial discrimination but I didn't

know what to do about it and Dr King provided me the technique the tactic and the philosophy

so as a student we study the way of peace the way of love the way of non-violence

black and white college students during the sit-ins and later during the freedom ride

it may be unbelievable to some of you that in 1961 black people and white people couldn't be seated

together on a greyhound bus leaving washington dc the same year that president barack obama was born

to travel through Virginia through North Carolina's through South Carolina through Georgia

through Alabama through Mississippi on our way to New Orleans to test a decision of the united

states supreme court in 1961 May 1961 to be exact May 1st 1961 13 of us white and black

met in Washington DC for a period of training

and I remember so well the night of May 3rd 1961 we went to a Chinese restaurant now growing up

in rural Alabama attending school in Nashville Tennessee I'd never been to a Chinese restaurant

never had Chinese food before and during that evening while we were eating

someone said you should eat well because this may be like the last supper

on May 4th 1961 there's 13 of us boarded a greyhound bus and others boarded a trailway bus

my sleepmate was a young white gentleman

connecticut the two of us tried to enter a so-called

white waiting room in rock hill south carolina about 30 miles from charlotte north carolina

and a group of young men members of the clan

attacked us beat us and left us lying in a pool of blood

many years later to be excited

in February 09 one of the men who had beat me and my seat mate came to my office on capitol

hill with his son his son had been encouraging his father to seek out the people that have wronged

came in and said Mr Lewis i'm one of the people that beat you on May 9 1961.

I want to apologize

you said I'm sorry will you forgive me and I said I accept your apology

you're forgiven your son started crying he started crying I started crying they hugged

me I hugged him back and call them brothers that is the power of the philosophy and the discipline

of non-violence to be reconciled to lay down the burden of separation the burden of division and

move toward the creation of the beloved community it is I hope that this book March 1 March 2 book 3

would inspire another generation of young people

to stand up to speak up to speak out and find a way to get in the way and get in

good trouble necessary trouble to make our country and make our world a better place

listen just as soon as I see Jesus of the man who set me for real he was a man who led and suffered

you know he died for you and for me I wanna thank him because he kept me

thank him because he taught me thank him because he blessed me I think I'm called he never left me

I want to thank you Jesus for all you've done for me how I got over how

Jerusalem I want to walk out the streets of gold

in the homeland of the soul I wanna see the hostile wives who I travel for the day and

my soul

with your hands now somebody clapping your hands somebody clapping your hands yes

lord I just want to thank you as I thank you I thank you said I thank you for blessing me up

for blessing me did you bless me can you bless me but I thank you for keeping me lord I thank you

exalted

how I got over one more time

how I got

it over like you wonder

we we promised y'all a good time didn't we

now we're just getting started sit on back how about a round of applause for jj and

children

next time I'm not gonna go after sean

amazing grace

the sound

life me

but right right right right now

I see

was grace that taught my heart to fear and grace my face that grace

praise god praise god praise god praise god praise god sing with me praise god praise god

praise god praise god praise god praise god praise god praise god praise god

my god let's say we moan the devil to know what you're talking about

we've known last days to see

god's praise we first be gone

so the moment I wake up before I put on my makeup I say a little prayer for you

and while I'm combing my hair now

and wondering what dress you wear now I say a little prayer for you forever and ever you'll

stay in my heart and I will love you forever and never we never will pardon how I love you

together together is how it must be to live without you would only mean heartbreak for me

I say a little prayer for you

stay in my heart and I will love you forever and never we never will pardon how I love you

together together is how it must be to live without you would only mean

my darling believe me for there is no one

but you please love me too

I'm in love with you

say you love me too

I ain't my friend baby

oh

well forever

together it's how it must be to live without you would

say you love me too

I am in love

Jordan Davis

what you want baby I got it

I ain't gonna do you wrong while you're gone I ain't gonna do you wrong cause I don't wanna

fall out spoil the respect get home hey baby I'm about to get all my money

and all I'm asking in return is to give me my properties when you get home

when you

I know what it means to me r-e-s-p-e-c-t take care of tcb

find out what it means to me rbsp ect take care of tcp oh yeah

Brandon Rose

hey

lord I stand before you once again

I'm so glad that I know you understand

I've done everything I know how to do

and as usual I end up crying out to you

I try so hard to do my best

but I don't feel like I'll make it through this can't remember feeling so much pain

and my tears keep falling down like pouring rain I try to force myself to wear a smile

but it's just not there this pain I'm feeling deep inside my heart seems so unfair

it really feels like I won't make it through another day

so I stand before you with a broken heart and all I can say is precious

would you do that would you please do that for me lead me on help me to stand please help me now

see I can't front lord standing here today

cause I stumbled here and there along the way

I'm praying even as I sing this song for my breakthrough I hope it won't be too long

I try to force myself to wear a smile but it's just not there

this pain I'm feeling deep inside my heart seems so unfair this time I feel like I won't make it

through another day so I come before you with a broken heart and all I can say is the precious

lord

would you do that would you do that for

me

help me to stand

deep down I know you will come through

that's why i'm reaching reaching up to you

cause I need to feel your loving arms again and when I feel your love and that's that's when

I'll be okay I will be okay I will make it if you take my hands

and please me

please

take my hand take my hands take my hand take my hand and hold me

my please

won't you help me

me

take my hand hold my hand hold my hand tell me

how about one more time for bryce and beer

Color Me Music

my mother there's too many of you crying

brother brother brother there's fall too many of you died yeah you know we've got to find a way

to bring some love in here today

there's no need to escalate you seek war is not the answer for only love can

you know we've gotta find a way

to bring some loving here today making lives and picket signs don't punish me with brutality

talk to me so you can see what's going on what's going on what's going on

laughs

everybody thinks we're wrong

but who's been in judges simply cause our hair is long you know we've gotta find a way

to bring some understanding here today picking lines and picket size don't you punish me with

brutality come on and talk to me so you can see what's going on what's going on what's going on

there's no need to escalate you see war is not the answer for only love can conquer hate

you know we've gotta find a way to

come on and talk to me so you can see what's going on what's going on what's going on

me all things ain't what they used to be alone

where did all the blue skies go poison is the wind that blows

all wasting all the oceans get upon our sins fish for the mercury

oh mercy mercy me

all things ain't what they used to be on

radiation underground and in the sky animals and birds who live nearby are down

how much more abuse for a man can she

stand

rockets moonshots spinning one

nation no chance to increase my name feels pile up

everybody thinks we're wrong

but who are they to judge us simply cause we wear our hair

Kenny Washington

Daniel Jordan

Carter Graham

I said to young people and I said to you whether you're young or middle-aged or older like I am

you must never ever give up you must never ever give in you must keep the faith

and keep your eyes on the prize the struggle to redeem the soul of America to struggle to

create a beloved community to struggle to create a truly multiracial democratic society it's not a

struggle that lasts for one day a one week or one month or one year it is a struggle of a lifetime

so we must continue so I said to you hang in there keep the faith be hopeful be optimistic be happy

thank you thank you for being here

Andrew

thank you for taking the time to tune in and join us for this event we look forward to the

day when we can once again welcome you safely to our venues in person for the magic of live

concerts as patrons who have enjoyed the talents of faculty students and visiting artists you are

an important part of our music community and you have supported us in so many ways

of course we welcome your financial support as we navigate this challenging time see the links

included on this page should you wish to make a secure credit card donation thank you for joining

us today and for helping us make the power of music accessible together we can make a difference

the most important discussion that we have to have is that all people

deserve to be free and so the discussion has to be about equality and freedom and justice

this video is important for the college of music primarily because it makes a statement

that we're committed to equality and freedom for all and that black lives matter i think that it is

important during these times that we enlist allies because how things have always changed in America

is when people stand together not black against white but black and white against racial injustice

and inequality the thing about musicians is that we exist together much more than we exist apart I

am so much stronger with Rodney at my side than I am by myself in a room and as I communicate

that togetherness we hope our audiences start to look around them and see how can we be more

together and less apart people need to know that they're not alone when you feel like there's

support from or an organization that you belong to and that everyone may not be coming from the

same place and understand all of the struggles and that we each have we recognize that we do

have struggles and there's there's feeling that support from your college or university is i

think extremely valuable for me it's been valuable to to see a lot of the people around the world

fighting for the same things that I'm fighting for

you know and it gives you strength I think it's important that people see us the faculty

performing doing what we do what we choose to perform is really important it sets an example and

it exposes them to music they might not otherwise or this is what I hope to do is expose my students

to music they might not otherwise come across well i think messages like this and performances

like this send a strong message to our students and to our community our alumni and our faculty

that we hear the voices of the needed and we hear the voices of those who have been

disproportionately affected by injustices in this country I think collectively as a faculty and as

artists ourselves we won't stand by and listen to this quietly we're going to use our voice

and our platform as artists and as educators and as citizens and members of the community to let

folks know that times are ready to change and they need to change they've been ready for a long time

hi I'm Jadrian Tarver a DMA student here at the College of Music and I'm Belle Coty

a first year master's student studying heart performance welcome to the Billman Music Pavilion

we wish you could be here with us in person but to help keep spartans safe we'll be taking you on

a virtual tour we can't wait to experience this state-of-the-art building together

this is our first look at the building 2 so let's go check it out

wow

this is gorgeous

this is Murray Hall which will be used principally for jazz rehearsal and performance there are five

large spaces that have been added for rehearsal performance and teaching music all include high

ceilings and specialized wall treatments for sound quality and tech infrastructure

for things like capturing audio and video as well as streaming for master classes and performances

Murray and Hollander Hall will be used for recitals so they feature variable acoustics

and theatrical lighting and Eichler Hall is set up for the future installation of an ambisonic

speaker system the Billman Pavilion has lots of areas for students to hang out this is the study

mezzanine with 12 stations for students to sit it overlooks the atrium which is perfect for natural

lighting and if you're not afraid of heights there are great places inside and out to sit

study collaborate or just relax and chill we added 45 new practice rooms which were

specifically designed for different types of music they are all designed to be sound isolated which

allows us to hear ourselves clearly accurately and comfortably without disruption from adjacent rooms

instruction may have started in June of 2018 but this project has been in the works for years

so to all the wonderful people who helped make this happen we would like to say thank

you there is so much more that we can show you in this quick tour we can't wait for you to be

able to explore yourself stay safe spartans and we'll see you on campus soon go green

the most important discussion that we have to have is that all people

deserve to be free and so the discussion has to be about equality and freedom and justice

this video is important for the College of Music primarily because it makes a statement

that we're committed to equality and freedom for all and that black lives matter I think that it is

important during these times that we enlist allies because how things have always changed in America

is when people stand together not black against white but black and white against racial injustice

and inequality the thing about musicians is that we exist together much more than we exist apart i

am so much stronger with Rodney at my side than I am by myself in a room and as I communicate

that togetherness we hope our audiences start to look around them and see how can we be more

together and less apart people need to know that they're not alone when you feel like there's

support from or an organization that you belong to and that everyone may not be coming from the

same place and understand all of the struggles and that we each have we recognize that we do

have struggles and there's feeling that support from your college or university is I

think extremely valuable for me it's been valuable to to see a lot of the people around the world

fighting for the same things that I'm fighting for

you know and it gives you strength I think it's important um that people see us the faculty

performing doing what we do what we choose to perform is really important it sets an example and

it exposes them to music they might not otherwise or this is what I hope to do is expose my students

music they might not otherwise come across well I think messages like this and performances

like this send a strong message to our students and to our community our alumni and our faculty

that we hear the voices of the needed and we hear the voices of those who have been

disproportionately affected by injustices in this country I think collectively as a faculty and as

artists ourselves we won't stand by and listen to this quietly we're going to use our voice

and our platform as artists and as educators and as citizens and members of the community to let

folks know that times are ready to change and they need to change they've been ready for a long time

The Description of 1.17.2021 | Jazz, Spirituals, Prayer and Protest Concert: Peacefully protesting as we come togeth...