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Practice English Speaking&Listening with: Transition & Linking Words in English | Advanced Writing & IELTS Vocabulary & Grammar

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- Hello everyone and welcome back to English with Lucy.

Recently I've been receiving loads of messages

asking if I can talk about words

like however, moreover and furthermore.

I imagine that this is because some of you or many of you

are looking to take a writing exam in the near future.

These words are called transitions or linking words.

They help prepare a reader for upcoming information

and they also make your writing flow.

Today I'm not only going to give you loads of linking words

that you can use in your writing,

but I'm also going to show you

where they should be placed in a sentence

and with what punctuation.

This can be quite complicated

so I've tried to simplify it for you.

I've also included lots of exception to the general rules

so hopefully you'll walk out feeling a lot more confident

about using linking words.

So this video is perfect for improving your writing

and your vocabulary but if you want to improve

your listening and your pronunciation even further,

I highly recommend the special method of reading books

whilst listening to the audiobook version on audible.

It sounds weird but let me explain and it really works.

Take a book that you have already read in English

or a book that you would like to read in English.

I've got loads of recommendations in the description box

down below and read that book whilst listening to

the audiobook version read by a native.

Reading alone will not help you with your pronunciation.

English is not a strictly phonetic language.

The way a word is spelt might not give any indication

as to how that word is pronounced.

It can be really, really difficult for learners.

If you listen to a word as you read it,

your brain will start making connections

and the next time you see that word

you will know how it's pronounced,

and the next time you hear that word,

you should know how it's spelt.

It is such an effective method and the best part is

you can get one free audiobook,

that's a thirty day free trial on audible,

by clicking on the link down below in the description box

and signing up.

Then you can download one of my many recommendations.

Give it a try, it really works.

Right, let's get on with the lesson.

Firstly before we discuss any vocabulary,

I want to talk about placement

because what's the point in knowing loads and loads of words

if you don't know where to put them.

Please note it would be impossible to cover every

single possibility in this lesson.

So I'm treating this lesson as a lovely overview

that will give you a general understanding

of transition words and where to put them.

Most linking words and phrases can appear

in three places within a sentence.

The beginning, the middle and the end.

They can also be used to join two sentences together.

For the four placements that I'm going to talk about,

pay particular attention to the punctuation

as it's really important,

especially if you're doing a writing exam.

Let's start with the beginning.

Take a look at this example.

Group English lessons can be very

cost-effective for students.

Moreover, these classes can be a great opportunity

to meet like-minded people.

Moreover is at the beginning of the sentence.

Another example, the initial business plan

seemed very promising.

However, the profit margins proved to be unattainable.

Again, however, the linking word,

is at the beginning of the sentence.

Let's move on to the middle.

Linking words in the middle of a sentence

usually come after the subject.

I'm going to use the same examples again

but show you the different placement of the linking word.

Group English lessons can be very

cost-effective for students.

These classes, moreover, can be a great opportunity

to meet like-minded people.

Moreover comes in the middle of the sentence

after the subject.

The initial business plan seemed very promising.

The profit margins, however, proved to be unattainable.

Again, however comes after the subject

in the middle of the sentence.

At the end.

Group English lessons can be

very cost-effective for students.

These classes can be a great opportunity

to meet like-minded people, moreover.

Moreover comes at the end of the sentence here.

The initial business plan seemed very promising.

The profit margins proved to be unattainable, however.

Now let's talk about inserting a linking word

or phrase between two sentences.

In formal writing, instead of a full stop,

two separate sentences can be joined by a semi-colon.

The semi-colon comes before the transition word.

The semi-colon replaces the full stop.

For example, group English lessons can be very

cost-effective for students; moreover these classes

can be a great opportunity to meet like-minded people.

The final example.

The initial business plan seemed very promising;

however, the profit margins proved to be unattainable.

Now let's learn some more linking words.

I'm going to provide you with some linking word categories

and then some example vocab for each category.

There are so many linking words and phrases.

It would be such a boring lesson if I covered them all.

I mean I could if you wanted it, but it would be long.

I do recommend you take a pen and paper for this part.

After the vocabulary section, I will be discussing

some exceptions to the placement rules.

Let's start with addition.

We have in addition,

in addition,

additionally,

additionally,

moreover,

moreover,

furthermore,

furthermore,

also,

also,

as well,

as well.

Next order and sequence.

We can have first, second, third

or firstly, secondly, thirdly.

First of all,

first of all.

Next,

next.

Then,

then.

Finally,

finally.

Previously,

previously.

Meanwhile,

meanwhile.

Now contradiction.

However,

however.

On the other hand,

on the other hand.

On the contrary,

on the contrary.

Conversely,

conversely.

Nevertheless,

nevertheless.

Unlike,

unlike.

Next we have example.

For example,

for example.

For instance,

for instance.

Such as,

such as.

Like,

like.

We also have comparison.

Similarly,

similarly.

In comparison,

in comparison.

Comparatively,

comparatively.

At the same time,

at the same time.

Likewise,

likewise.

Like or unlike,

like,

unlike.

Additionally we have clarification.

In other words,

in other words.

As mentioned,

as mentioned.

That is,

that is.

Again,

again.

Next we have cause and effect.

Therefore,

therefore.

As a result,

as a result.

Consequently,

consequently.

Thus,

thus.

And lastly we have conclusions.

In conclusion,

in conclusion.

In summary,

in summary.

Overall,

overall.

In brief,

in brief.

In short,

in short.

Right now let's discuss some exceptions to the placement

rules I mentioned at the beginning of the video.

Exception number one relates to such as.

Such as appears after a noun

so never at the beginning of a sentence.

For example, there are many ways of improving

fitness levels, such as increasing cardiovascular activity

and eating healthy foods.

Exception number two relates to also.

Also can appear at the beginning or end of a sentence.

If it's at the end of a sentence,

it is not preceded by a comma.

For example the package is due to arrive at midday.

Also, they're delivering to our neighbours.

That's at the beginning of a sentence and at the end,

the package is due to arrive at midday.

They are delivering to our neighbours also.

No comma, there is no comma before also

at the end of a sentence.

Exception number three relates to as well.

As well only comes at the end of the sentence

and again it is not preceded by a comma.

The package is due to arrive at midday.

They are delivering to our neighbours as well.

No comma.

Exception number four is for a whole bunch of words:

thus, again, likewise, like and unlike

usually only appear at the beginning of a sentence.

Note that like and unlike should be followed by a noun.

For example the instructions were unclear.

Thus, the furniture was assembled incorrectly.

Carrots make great snacks.

Likewise, peppers are healthy and tasty.

Like peppers, carrots make great snacks.

Or unlike chilli peppers, carrots make great snacks.

See how like and unlike are followed by a noun.

Exception number five related to meanwhile.

Meanwhile can appear the beginning of a sentence

or after a subject.

It's not usually found at the end of a sentence.

School had begun.

Meanwhile, class numbers were still being finalised

or school had begun.

Class numbers, meanwhile, were still being finalised.

Right, that is a lot of information I've given you today.

There is still a lot more to cover in the realm

of transition words and phrases

or linking words and phrases.

If you would like another video,

if you'd like to go into further depth

or learn more vocabulary, please let me know.

Your homework for today is to pick five

of the linking words or phrases

that I've shown in this video

and write sentences with them in different places.

If you want to do fewer sentences, you can.

If you want to do more, that's also fine.

Don't forget to check out audible.

The link for your free audiobook and thirty day free trial

is in the description box along with my recommendations

and don't forget to connect with me

on all of my social media.

I've got my Facebook, my Instagram, my Twitter

and my Lucy Bella Earl channel

where I talk about life and everything

that's not related to English.

I will see you soon for another lesson, muah.

Or a book that you would like to read in English,

I've got loads of description boxes in the books down below.

And the best part it is, you can get one free audiobook,

that's an audible ah.

It is such an effective method.

It is, it is, it is late and I am tired

and the bells have started ringing.

Group English lessons can be very useful, yes they can,

yes they can Lucy.

Moreover, these classes can prove very effective,

wah my god, I'm going always bananas.

The placement rules I mentioned

at the beginning of the video.

I'm losing my voice.

How has that happened, I've hardly spoken to anyone today.

I literally spoke to someone on the dog walk

and the delivery man.

That's it so I don't know how I've lost my voice.

For example there are many ways.

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The Description of Transition & Linking Words in English | Advanced Writing & IELTS Vocabulary & Grammar