Practice English Speaking&Listening with: Fridrich F2L: Going Slow and Looking Ahead

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Hi guys, welcome to my Fridrich F2L Tutorial on Going Slow and Looking Ahead.

You're probably watching this video because you've recently learned Fridrich F2L, and you've gotten a lot faster with it.

But now, you've hit a road block. You keep on practicing like you used to, but now your times are not getting faster anymore.

This is the time to start learning looking ahead.

Looking ahead is a basic technique that will help you get faster at F2L, no matter how fast you are.

Even if you consistently average under 15 seconds, looking ahead will still help you.

In this tutorial, I'll teach you exactly what is looking ahead, how it's useful, and how to practice getting better at it.

If you want to learn looking ahead, you should be able to solve the first two layers in under 25 seconds, including the cross.

And you should be able to insert corner edge pairs from different angles.

Like normally you would just do this angle here. But you should be able to do like going back over there, and basic stuff like that.

If you're F2L isn't that fast, you should just keep practicing, and you'll eventually get under 25 seconds

which shouldn't be that hard.

And I'd also recommend looking at Badmephisto's F2L videos. They're really really good.

Even if you are under 25 seconds for your F2L, I'd still highly recommend looking at them. They're really helpful.

OK, so we're going to look at what actually makes your F2L slow.

I have this cross done - I just randomly scrambled and made a cross.

So when you're solving F2L (say I'll solve this pair). So you're solving this (and I solve it back here),

And when you're solving it, what makes you slow is you pause to look for the next pieces you'll solve.

So it may be only one or two seconds, but you're going to pause a lot, and that will add up and make your times really slow.

OK, so here's another random scramble - cross is done.

So I'm going to solve this. So I'm solving it and then I'm going to look for pieces.

And I see this. But that took like two seconds.

So I'm going to solve this - that one, I just pointed.

And then I'm going to look for pieces. This and that. And that took me a long time.

And I'm going to look for pieces again. This goes there.

OK, so I solved it but when I'm looking for pieces I stopped a lot, and then that really adds up and slows you down.

But what if during F2L, while I'm solving the first corner edge pair, I look at the second one, while I'm solving the first one.

Then when I solve the second one, I already know where it is and how to solve it, and there's going to be no pauses.

That's called looking ahead.

If you're not that good at F2L, you might think that's kind of hard.

Yes, it's hard. But if you turn slowly, it's a little bit easier to look ahead, because you have more time.

Turning slower with very few pauses, will result in faster times than turning fast with a lot of pauses.

And turning fast and then slow, fast then slow, that's not good either.

You just want to keep your turning speed at a steady pace.

You can sort of compare it to like if you're jogging a long distance or something,

You have run a long distance, like I don't know, like two miles.

What do you think would be faster? Sprinting and then walking, sprinting, walking? Or just jogging the whole way through?

Obviously, the jogging would be faster because you just go consistently and you would never stop running.

OK, now I'll show a couple solves of me turning slowly without any pauses (or few pauses)

and turning really fast with a lot of pauses. You'll see which one is actually faster.

OK, so I'm going to do the first solve going fast with a lot of pauses.

My cross is already done so I'm just going to do the F2L part.

And I'm going to use my stackmat timer to time it. So... here we go.

OK, 11 seconds.

OK so I'm going to another solve with slow turning and few pauses.

You see the cross is done. This is the same scramble as before.

Stackmat timer. So... here we go.

8.22 seconds. So you can see that's about 3 seconds faster than the fast solve with a lot of pauses.

And that was consistently turning at the same speed.

So going slow with few pauses is actually faster so.... that's proof right there.

OK, now that I've told you how important looking ahead is and how it helps, I'm going to actually show you how to do it.

The concept isn't really all that hard - I kind of already told you but I'll show you again with the cube this time.

So when you're solving a corner edge pair,

you should be looking at the next pair you will solve the whole time you're solving the first pair.

So I have this randomly mixed up cube - the cross is done.

I solved the cross first so I'm just going to show you the F2L part.

So I see these two - I'm going to solve it.

And when I'm solving it, I'm going to search for another corner and edge to solve.

So I'm going to solve this - keep on looking - and when I'm still solving this, I see these two.

So I already know where they are, so I can immediately move on and solve them.

And when I'm solving this, I notice these two.

And I can immediately move on to it without pausing.

And when I'm solving this, I already saw this and that, so I can immediately solve it with no pauses.

That's basically looking ahead.

One way to practice looking ahead in F2L is to do what Dan Knights said.

Dan Knights is the 2003 world champion. Anyway, a quote from him is:

So that might sound a little bit confusing, so I'll just do an example solve.

I'm going to do a scramble - you can just look at the scramble, and you can pause the video so you can do it.

OK so I have the scramble done. I'm just going to do the cross, you can copy what I do.

OK so I have the cross done. I'm just going to do what Dan Knights said again.

I see this and that. So these two - I'm going to solve it.

This way. And half way through I'm solving it, I'm going to look for another pair.

I see this - I see these two. So I'm going to solve this, and I'm going to keep my eyes on these two.

And I know this one is here and I know that one is there.

So I can immediately solve it. And halfway I'm going to look for another pair.

This and that. So I'm going to solve this, and I can solve that.

And halfway through solving this pair, I can look for another - this and that.

And I can solve it.

Another way of practicing looking ahead and turning consistently is to use a metronome.

So a metronome is usually used for musical purposes.

You can have a beat set to it.

And you can use this to help you look ahead in cubing.

So I'm going to set this to 60 - 60 right here - that's 60 beats a minute. So that's one beat per second.

So I'm going to set this to 60 - 60 right here - that's 60 beats a minute. So that's one beat per second.

And what you do - every time it beats, you do one turn.

You never want to miss a beat. If you miss a beat, then it's too fast for you - you might want to go to 40 or something or 50.

And this will force you to look ahead and to turn at a consistent speed.

So anyway I'm going to start at 60 - I'm going to show you how it works.

I'm going to do one turn every single beat.

OK so that was it. It's pretty boring, but it will help you a lot.

And if you're comfortable with 60, work on it for 10-15 minutes.

Then go up to like 72, and then maybe like 80, and then like 92. and so on; go up by 10s.

So that's basically looking ahead.

Looking itself is not that complicated, but it will help you get faster greatly if you get good at it.

Remember while solving a pair, you should be looking at the next pair you're going to solve.

Many times you're going to catch yourself looking at the pair you're currently solving.

You want to always force yourself to look at the next pair and turning at a consistent speed.

You start out by looking ahead and turning slowly.

And if your looking ahead gets better, you can GRADUALLY increase your turning speed,

and you have to always make sure you are turning at a consistent pace.

If you follow these tips, you will start to see improvements in maybe a few days or a week,

depending on how much you practice.

And you know, getting looking ahead is not that easy, so don't expect yourself to see rapid improvement.

You have to practice looking ahead a lot. Tons and tons of practice.

But eventually you will get really good.

I've also included in the description some websites where people give some more advice on looking ahead.

And I hope this video has been helpful to you, and I hope you will get faster at F2L.

If you have any questions, comment below, or send me a message. Thanks for watching! :)

The Description of Fridrich F2L: Going Slow and Looking Ahead