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Practice English Speaking&Listening with: Quartet

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(honking)

- Mado, look at this.

Napoleon's.

- Napoleon's? - Mm-hmm. Napoleon's sabre.

One of his sabres, I suppose.

He must've had several of them.

A man like Napoleon.

(distant shouting)

- Stephan?

- Well?

- Where did you get that sword?

- From a Frenchman named de Coligny.

It belongs to his family.

- Why are they selling it?

- Because they need the money. Everybody needs money.

You know that. I know that.

- But shouldn't he be taking it to a museum?

- He has to do it on the sly.

His uncle and his mother don't want him to sell it.

They would stop him if they could.

- He probably has no right to sell it without his mother's consent.

- His mother has nothing to say.

- What you going to do with it?

- I'm going to send it to America.

- But... that's illegal.

- I saw a dress in the window of Jean Veron's today.

A sort of peach colour.

You might call it apricot.

It would suit you.

- Really? - Mm.

- Oh, you don't think I'm too pale?

- Oh, you can't take strong colours.

- You're probably right. - No, except black.

I like you in black. (laughing)

- My black crepe de Chine, that's chic, isn't it?

- Mm. Makes you look like a little nun.

We should get you a white-lace collar to go with it.

(soft piano music playing)

- Ah, there you are, Anna.

- Lola's in the Select. She'll be along in a minute.

(indistinct chatter)

I'm not in my assiette, as the dear French say.

- Now, what are we going to have?

- I've been trying to decide who's worse: men or women.

- Well, are we ready to order?

- Women are worse. They'll kick your face to bits if you let them.

- Oh, darling, don't be depressed.

Have a fine.

H.J., do call Lefranc. We are ready to order.

- M. Lefranc. (background chatter)

- Did you see Cri-Cri count me dead, H.J.?

Considering she came to my party last Saturday.

- Oh, don't worry about her, my dear. She's having her little hour.

- Till her painter throws her out.

- She's a character. She's a type.

They have their little hour, then we hear no more about them.

- Marya.

- Hello.

- There's that little... Zelli girl.

- Couldn't you turn up tomorrow? I wish you would.

I'd like to talk to you.

- I can't. I have to meet my husband.

- Where did she come from? Does anybody know?

- Somewhere rather vague and exotic.

Martinique? Could that be right?

Anyway, her mother's supposed to be a West Indian.

- That means she's a Creole.

- What is a Creole?

- I thought it was a way of cooking chicken. (nearby laughter)

- Oh, you know the Heidlers, do you?

- Not every well.

- Keep it that way. - Why?

If you have something to say, I wish you'd say it.

- I'm not too clear about the whole thing, but...

it seems there was a girl who killed herself.

Someone Heidler had had an affair with.

And then he had some sort of breakdown,

and his wife had to take him away.

To New York or somewhere.

I believe Mrs. Heidler paints.

It's pretty awful to think of the hundreds of women round here painting away, isn't it?

- She's a decorative little person.

You should get her to sit for you, Lois.

(background chatter)

- What does he do? - He's a very important man.

He makes discoveries.

He helps young people.

He has flair.

He also has money, of course. And that helps.

- ...working their fingers to the bone for him,

he doesn't have to do a thing; he doesn't have to pay for servants.

(French chatter)

- I hate all that kind of thing. Astral bodies and all the rest of it.

- Astral bodies is theosophy. - You've been neglecting us.

You want to avoid English people in Paris.

H.J. and I most completely agree with you.

If you see only Anglo-Americans in Paris,

what's the use of being here at all?

Oh, your husband's French, of course.

- He's a Pole.

- And he, uh... - He's an art dealer.

He acts between Frenchmen who want to sell and foreigners.

It's usually foreigners who want to buy.

- And what do the Frenchmen want to sell?

- Pictures, fur coats...

Madame Dubarry's prie-dieu.

Anything.

- H.J. and I have quite made up our minds

that eating is the greatest pleasure in life.

Haven't we, H.J.?

Well, I mean, it is, isn't it? It's one of the few pleasures that never let you down.

- Oh, the music. (indistinct chatter)

- What about sex? I mean, really. What about sex?

(indistinct chatter)

Well, are you forgetting about the sex? - What?

- He... he didn't say anything?

(soft piano music)

(indistinct chatter)

- I see that the Zelli girl's husband... been sentenced.

One year, to be followed by expulsion from France.

In other words, theft.

- Ah, I feel sorry for her, all the same.

I can just see how it happened.

People do get hold of girls like that.

- We should do something for her.

- Poor little devil.

What did you have in mind?

- We could have her in the spare room.

She probably hasn't got a bean.

- Huh. But... we don't know anything about her.

We don't even know where she's from.

People say she was born in the West Indies, Martinique,

or someplace like that.

- Is that supposed to be good, or bad?

- I'm not saying it's either. I'm merely stating a fact.

We don't know anything about her,

except that her husband is in jail.

It's true.

- I'm not going to have a discussion on that sort of level.

- I think you're getting bored again.

That's the reason you're ready to bring in anybody at any cost.

- You just want to shut me off and shut me in, make me into a tame husband.

- As if anyone could do that. - I won't live like that.

- It's no use doing too much for people, H...

It's simply no use doing too much for people . You know that, H.J..

- All we've ever done for anyone is to have them in the spare room.

- And look what trouble they brought with them.

All those types we tried to be kind to.

- I'm not interested in being kind to anyone. I'm interested in them.

In character.

In forms of life.

You should've married a stockbroker

and stayed with him in South Kensington.

- That is unfair. H.J.

You know perfectly well I'm only thinking of you. I...

I... I don't want us to get into any more impossible situations.

- Don't you see how dangerous it is to... to...

close oneself off?

Be afraid of...

Well, just because of some...

...unpleasant experience in the past?

(birdsong)

It's only a cubbyhole of a place, but she'll be alright.

(coughing)

(coughing)

(loud background chatter)

- Hello, Mado. - My poor boy.

What rotten luck.

- Mado, listen.

The worst, th-the very worst,

is that this has happened when I have no money.

What will you do? I worry myself to death about you.

- I'll manage something.

Tell me what happened exactly. I'd rather know.

- It's so stupid.

My defending lawyer didn't know his métier.

Instead of making a case...

Instead of making a case, he told the court how I speak six languages.

Well... no luck.

If only I had some money for you.

You must write at once to your family to send you some money.

Have you written yet? - Yes.

And... no.

I'll manage. I'm telling him. - How?

- I will. Only, I have such an awful cold, I can't think now.

This noise.

- What will you do?!

- Never mind.

As a matter of fact, some people asked me to go and live with them.

- Who? For godsakes, speak up!

- The Heidlers. You don't know them. They're English.

- It's alright, then. You go and live with them.

- I don't want to. - Listen.

Do you want drive me mad? They'll take care of you.

And I can have some peace of mind about you.

- My darling, I love you.

You'll be out in spring. The time will pass quickly.

- Quickly? My God, that's funny. Quickly.

- I'll come to see you every week.

And... in spring, we'll go away.

To...

to Berlin or Brussels.

- Promise you'll go and stay with these people. Promise.

- Yes, yes. Yes.

- Say something. Quick, speak to me.

- I love you.

I do.

- Alright. And you go and live with these English people.

Good. Finally.

My poor little Mado.

Are they nice?

- Oh, yes.

Very nice. (sniffling)

- I won't be able to stand it.

- It's awfully good of you to worry about me.

- Oh, nonsense. Rubbish.

We're your friends.

- Of course we are. - I do love your frock.

I shall paint you with short black gloves on.

Or - no, she'll have short green gloves.

What do you think, H.J.?

- Do show her the room.

- So here we are.

- You are very kind, you know, but--

- Oh, if you mean you're afraid of being a bother,

put that right out of your head.

I'm used to it.

H.J. is always rescuing some young genius or the other and installing them in here.

- I really haven't got any money at all.

I feel I ought to do something about it.

- Well, what... what will you do?

- I used to be on the stage, just sort in the chorus,

in England.

- You must let us take care of you.

I want it.

H.J. wants it.

I shall be awfully disappointed, and hurt, if you don't let me.

I know what it is.

I love H.J. so terribly, but...

...he isn't always awfully nice to me.

- It's just so difficult for me to trust anyone.

- Well, naturally, with the life you've led and your marriage.

- I didn't mean my marriage. Not Stephan.

- Y-you mustn't think I don't see the...

the angle that you look at life from.

Because I do.

Please rest now.

Do rest. Don't let's take anymore.

- It really wasn't any use talking to Lois about Stephan,

or how things were with me when I met him.

Women like Lois, who've always had money,

just don't understand what it's like for somebody like me,

who've never had any.

(indistinct chatter)

(French chatter)

(operatic singing)

- Oh, I'm sorry!

- I wasn't looking. - Oh, you speak English.

Very good.

Very nice.

Uh... I...

I understand perfectly.

You'd just come down from the second floor.

M. Gauthier, impresario. And there was no job.

And you're feeling rotten. - Yes.

- But I... I'm going up to the third floor,

in hope and joy, to M. Perron et Dussolier,

art dealers, auctioneers, with this precious object,

which you nearly-- - What is it?

- Voila.

Yes, to you, an ordinary rocking horse,

but do you know who sat on it?

One of Swinburne's children. The great English poet.

- He didn't have any children. - Uh, then it was Millet,

the great English painter.

He had many children.

Please, don't deny me again.

I've set all my hopes...

on this little horse.

- Stephan, Stephan.

(bell tolling)

- That's right, she likes it.

(clanging)

(Lois): Do you intend to keep going there?

- To see Stephan? Yes.

- Well... we don't approve.

You know, lots of girls make extraordinary marriages.

You know, for all sorts of reasons.

But the time comes when you must cut loose.

Can't you see that?

- No, I can't.

- Tsk. You're a very tiresome child.

You'll be alright.

You'll row your little boat along,

but if you try to help your husband, you are done.

(sighing) I hate myself made up.

I don't think it's my genre.

But H.J. likes it.

And I always give way to H.J..

I give him what he wants - till his mood changes.

- Will you lend me 100 francs?

If I had 100 francs, I could leave.

- Well... why on earth should you want to leave?

- You'll never have to see me again.

- We are making a great deal of fuss about nothing at all, aren't we?

Drama is catching, I find.

Don't let H.J. hear you, or he'll be very cross.

With both of us.

- You ought to do it often.

(chuckling) - Do you think so?

- Don't rush off.

Oh, God, I get so utterly sick of myself sometimes.

(sniffing)

Do you ever get sick of yourself?

- No. - Well, I get sick of myself.

(honking)

(excited chatter)

(up-tempo jazz playing)

(indistinct chatter)

Don't bother with coats...

- Ah, bonsoir, monsieur. (indistinct chatter)

Pardon.

Toot toot toot Won't be doin' no more waitin' ♪

Toot toot toot

He'll keep me syncopated

And feelin' fine

Here comes that 5-0-9

5-0-9

I hear the whistle

Blowin' down the line

I hear the train a-comin' ♪

Down the track

Oh my Jack

When it gets goin' ♪

There's no holdin' back

It's right on time

With something very special

Gettin' it home for me

I... ♪

Won't be doin' no more waitin' ♪

Toot toot toot

We'll be syncopated

And feelin' fine

Here comes that 5-0-9... ♪♪

(cheering)

- Oh, there you are, Guy. Where have you been?

- Oh, I've been hiding in the fog.

I didn't think anyone would want to see me.

(indistinct chatter)

- What is it? (sniffing)

- Oh, look. - Oh, yes!

- Would you like to try? I can drink whatever I like,

and pull myself together in a second with that.

Break it. Sniff it up.

- Oh. - Oh, my dear, it was in all the newspapers.

(voices distorting)

- What's this rubbish we've got here?

(indistinct chatter)

- What are you trying to do?

(whispering) Heidler doesn't like me talking to you.

- Why shouldn't he? You're imagining it.

He's very kind.

- Kind?

Heidler kind?

My God.

- I can't stand that self-righteous American Cairn fellow

Marya keeps on seeing.

I wonder if she's alright.

You're such a fool, Guy.

- Don't shout in my ear. - Well, get out of the way. Blocking up the bar.

- It's my bar. - Then you ought to give your clients a chance.

Come, my dear. You alright?

- French people pretend just as much as anybody else.

Ha. Maybe they pretend about different things.

Maybe not quite so obvious, but they all pretend.

(Lois chuckling) You'll find that out, dear,

when you've been here as long as I have.

- Sure. Excuse me.

- You see, Michel, men feel disgusted by what they do,

and so they drink, they take drugs,

and they're forever changing partners.

- What about women? - Oh, that's quite different.

They can stay happy with each other

because they only do what is beautiful.

Excuse me. I'm so sorry.

- They're like members of a harem who can't get on.

- It'll all blow over, no doubt.

- He doesn't know himself. That's what's so frightening.

He doesn't know his own nature. (sniffling)

I suppose it's a sort of innocence in him, really.

(people cheering) Oh, God, this damn thing hurts my head.

- Do you know why your door is open every morning?

Come over here, listen to what I have to say.

Must you do that? When I'm alone with you for five minutes,

you paint your mouth or perform some other monkey trick.

Your door is open, because I come up at night,

I look at you, and then I go away again.

Don't you know I've wanted you from the first moment I saw you?

Well, I kept off you, didn't I?

I knew I could have you by putting my hands on you, but I kept off you.

I thought it wouldn't be playing the game, you see, but there comes a limit.

I watched you tonight and now I know

that somebody else will get you if I don't. You're that sort.

- You're abominably rude and stupid.

You have no idea how other people feel.

- You think I don't know how you feel?

- It's odd, the way he always picks out the same kind of girl.

The crushed-petal type.

- This one's quite tough. - Mm-hmm.

- But they tend to wear the same kind of little-girl's frocks.

You know... You know, and other one...

...when she died...

...I cleared out the spare room. I got rid of all her things,

except this one pathetic little frock.

It was the one I painted her in. God knows why I kept it.

I pushed it out of sight up on a shelf.

Somehow I...

I just couldn't bring myself to throw it away.

It... it seemed...

It was too like a person. It was like her.

I found it the other day when I went to get the room ready for Marya.

Oh, God.

Just to touch it made me feel sick.

I hid it before H.J. came in.

God knows why I didn't burn it.

Bad enough I had to see it.

No need for him to go over all that again.

- You take very good care of him.

- She'll take care of herself.

I'm there to take care of him.

That's what he depends on, that in the end I'll pull him through.

- What about Lois?

- My dear, you simply don't understand Lois at all.

You are a funny little thing.

Why, look here. Do you know what she said about you?

I tell you this because I... I want you to realize

that Lois simply doesn't come into this at all between you and me.

She said, "The matter with Mado is she's too virtuous."

There. That's what she thinks about the situation.

- Ah, there you are.

- Come on.

- Miss Marya?

- You don't know anything about him, what he's like, or anything.

- Oh, what is he like? (cheering and applause)

- I detest all this self-restraint we're supposed to be exercising all the time.

I'm sick of it. One might as well be dead.

One is dead.

- He's right, huh? I haven't got any money myself, as you know.

But I'll borrow some for you. I'll borrow 500 francs.

It's not a whole lot, but at least that way,

you can live for a while at the Dome on coffee and croissants.

- I don't need money.

- Heidler is a humbug.

And God help you if you don't see that.

I need a good time huggin' ♪

Good time kissin' men

Don't want a part-time lover

Want a good time huggin' ♪

Full-time lover man

Kisses. Kisses for you?

Ah, drink, drink, drink.

- What are you doing out here in the cold?

We're looking for you. Lois is very worried about you. Come.

- Will you lunch with me again on Tuesday? - Tuesday.

- There's something not right about Cairn. I can't put my finger on it,

but I don't think he's the sort of person

you ought to know, quite frankly.

I'd like it if you didn't see him again.

Look, we don't have to stay here if you don't want to.

- I want to. - Why?

They're abominable lot of people.

It's just scruff.

- You don't know what it is to want to be like other people

and have a good time and be happy.

- Why are you drinking that? You're drunk already.

- It makes me wonderful.

- I love you so much, I wish I were dead.

Be nice to me.

I'll make you happy. That's what I'm here for.

I need a good time huggin' ♪

Good time kissin' man... ♪

Don't want a part-time lover

I want a good time huggin' ♪

Full-time lovin' man... ♪

Don't want a part-time lover

A full-time... ♪

Lovin'... ♪

Full-time lover man... ♪

Oh that man ♪♪

(cheering)

- Do you think I'm mad?

Possessed?

(groaning)

- Shhh.

- Go away.

- I want to comfort you.

- I'm so scared. - I want to hold you safe and tight.

- I'm so scared of being happy.

- There. There now. You're--

- I can't stand anymore. - You're excitable.

You'll tear yourself to bits. I'm holding you safe.

Safe and tight.

(whispering) Yes.

(Marya whimpering) Wh-wh-what are you saying?

- You don't understand. - Oh, yes, I do.

I do, my dear, I do. I do.

(birdsong)

Ah.

(background chatter)

- And, uh, what about the job with the modiste?

- They wanted to see my work permit.

- Same old story.

What it is to be foreigner in Paris.

You will be able to come, won't you, next Sunday?

I mean, it's not too much trouble for you, is it?

- It's only half an hour on the tram. I told you.

It's nothing.

- Perhaps it's true, then.

You do care for me.

- I love you.

I'm waiting.

- You went to the prison again today, didn't you?

(clucking tongue)

You can't go those places and...

come home and expect everything to be alright.

- Lois? I want to leave.

The sooner, the better.

- Don't be silly, Mado.

You know that I'm pulling every string I can to fix you up.

So is H.J.

I'm almost sure I can get you a mannequin job in about a month or six weeks

with... what's his name on the Rue Royale?

I don't believe in forcing things.

I believe in letting them alone.

And I hate scenes.

Of course you can't go.

- The stupid thing is, I really can't,

unless you lend me some money.

- Could you move your head a bit?

No, to... to the left.

- The only thing I can think about is not getting paid!

It inhibits my performance.

- We must get Mado another hat, H.J.

She must be chic. She must do us credit.

Is she coming to the country this weekend?

Oh, no. No, she's going to the prison again.

You must stop her, H.J..

Ah, aren't they pathetic?

They really look as if they could do with a good meal.

Not to speak of a bath.

You wouldn't care to have them in the spare room, would you, H.J.?

Do sit down, darling. I can't see a thing.

- I may be young and innocent...

...but I know a hussy when I see one.

- Darling Marya!

Ah, really, Guy, you don't know her very well.

She's a sweet, young thing, on the sentimental side.

- You go away, Guy!

- He wasn't doing anything.

He's just a little pink-eyed, aren't you, darling?

I like your scarf.

Very dashing.

- It's Hugo's. It's the only thing he left behind when he ran off.

- I expect you to come to the country this weekend.

- You know I have to see Stephan next Sunday.

- Must we have all that again? - Let's go to Luna Park.

We'll put Mado on the joy wheel and watch her being banged about a bit.

Well, she ought to amuse us sometimes.

She ought to sing for her supper.

That's what she's here for, after all, isn't it?

Well, shall we go to Luna Park?

- No, I don't think so.

- I'm bored to death with Montparnasse!

Bored, bored... bored!

Well, let's go to a proper musical.

That's what I feel like. Something really low-life.

- What? - You'd like that, wouldn't you, Marya?

Something really canaille?

- You're coming to Brunoy on Saturday, aren't you?

What's the matter?

- Nothing. - Can't you come? Just to please me.

Can't you not go to the prison just for once?

(indistinct chatter)

- Do you think I'm the maid to be made love to...

every time the mistress's back is turned?

(birdsong)

(dog whining)

(gunfire)

(barking)

(indistinct chatter)

H.J., I can't go on with this.

It isn't my line at all.

- But that's not playing the game, is it?

Not any sort of game.

- What game? Your game? Lois's game?

Why should I be playing Lois's game?

- I must tell you that you misunderstand Lois utterly.

You will persist in judging us by the standards of the awful life you've lived.

Can't you see you're in a different world now?

You're not going to be let down. You're with friends.

Now what's she doing there? What's keeping her?

My dear, must we have this conversation now?

Lois doesn't want to be given away.

She just doesn't want anybody to know.

And I assure you, that is all she cares about.

(bell tolling) - I see.

(indistinct chatter)

(Lois): Why don't you take Marya? They'll be some company for you.

(H.J.): She may refuse. You know how she is.

- Yes, she is terribly surly.

She's very embarrassing sometimes,

you know, when there are people.

You ought to tell her.

- Don't forget her background.

- You mustn't think that I don't know

the arrangement that you two have made about me!

- You're mad. - You've made an arrangement:

If he wants the woman, let him have her. Do you think I don't know?!

- Don't shout. They can hear every single word next door.

(shouting) - No, no, let me talk to her!

You don't understand how to deal with a woman of this sort. I do.

- Look out, Heidler, I'll kill you!

- You're hysterical! Talk calmly.

- I am not going to live with Lois and you any longer! I am not!

- What's this all about? What do you want? Money?

- Swine!!! Incredible swine!!!

(grunting) Let me get at him again!

- You're right, you're right! Oh, God. Oh, God.

Leave me alone! I'm done with you!

- Oh, H.J., my dearest-- - Damn you! Leave me alone!

- Hadn't you better get back to bed, Marya?

- I'm going to bed. I'm very drunk.

I shan't remember anything at all about this in the morning.

- He always does that. When there's been a scene,

he always says next morning that he was too drunk to remember anything.

It's his way of getting out of things.

I say, you're not going to talk to anybody in Paris...

about this, are you?

- Is that all you're worried about?

- Yes... as a matter of fact.

- Shall I send Lois away? I'll do anything you want.

If you're not happy with us, I'll find somewhere else for you.

There now. Be quiet now.

It's all going to be alright.

I'll break with her. I'll take you away somewhere. Is that what you want?

- No. - I'll take a hotel room for you.

We'll have a place of our own.

Don't worry.

- H.J.? I'm coming up.

- H.J., be good to Lois. You must be good to Lois.

- I shouldn't worry too much about Lois if I were you.

I don't intend to let you go.

Make no mistake about that.

(crying)

(sobbing)

Get up at once.

Please. Get up.

I can't stand this. I won't tolerate this.

(Lois sobbing) Lois, please, please. Get up.

(sniffling and sobbing)

Now, now, now.

Go and wash your face.

Please.

Here, here, here.

Please.

Please.

(background chatter) - You left those people?

Really, you must be mad.

Where are you now?

- In a hotel.

What's it matter where I am? I'm waiting for you.

- And when I am free, I'll have no money. I will have to leave France.

You have friends and you lose them. It's not so funny, you know!

- Don't quarrel with me.

- Forgive me. I'm, uh...

I'm going off my head in here.

Last Sunday, when you didn't come--

- No, don't.

- You couldn't help it. You were ill.

- Yes.

(metal rattling) (French chatter)

- Every number they called, I thought it was mine.

I was glad when the time was up, I can tell you.

You go mad, shut away in here.

- I never will not turn up again, Stephan.

So don't worry.

- I'm not late. Your clock is fast.

- What happened the day before yesterday?

And Saturday.

One week.

I haven't seen you for one week.

- Open your eyes, savage.

- I feel as if I'd fallen down a precipice.

(H.J. chuckling)

- You funny thing.

- Please. - Hmm?

- Be nice with me.

I love you so.

- There. There.

There. You're such a darling...

...pretty little thing.

Such a funny, pretty little thing.

I say, did you notice what I did with my wristwatch?

(sighing)

Lois has got hold of two Hungarians for tonight.

I promised I'd turn up.

Lois asked me to meet that young American guy, what's-his-name...

Sculptor.

Are you alright for money?

Better leave you some money and, uh...

Whew. Say, it's frightfully hot in here. Ahem.

Mind if I open the window? Get some air in.

(window rattling) Ah. It's better. Now, where's your handbag, hmm?

Now, look here.

Do go and dine somewhere decent, for godsake. Hmm?

Lois is expecting you on Saturday. You know that.

- Oh, she is, is she? - She certainly is.

And so am I.

- Why should I be a butt for Lois and her friends?

She wants me there so she can talk at me,

so she can watch for the right moment to put her enormous foot down!

- You talk the most awful nonsense sometimes, don't you?

- Aren't Lois's feet enormous?

Huge, big feet like puddles?

(laughing)

Alright, I'll come.

What's it matter, anyway?

- I hate having to explain things.

I hate having to talk about things.

Surely you must see that you can't let Lois down.

- What about letting me down?

- We must keep up appearances.

We must play the game.

Savage.

Bolshevist.

You'll end up in Red Russia. That's what'll happen to you.

- It's horrible when someone has no self-control,

the consequences for everyone else around.

- She was pretty. - Mm. She tried to kill herself at least twice.

And that was ages before we even knew her.

Once, she tried to cut her throat.

I didn't put the scar in, of course, but one could distinctly see it.

(French chatter)

(bell tolling)

"It's as if all the blood in my body

is being drained very slowly,

all the time.

All the blood in my heart.

What can I say to make you believe me?"

- You're right, of course.

It's my fault for getting involved

with these neurasthenics.

But it's not I who seek them out.

They who find me.

It's as if they sensed a weakness in me that...

...they fasten onto.

- Ah, Marya! Hello, my dear. Now, you just pop upstairs, put on something warm,

we'll go out and have a lovely day together, huh?

- Who sent you?

- Sent me? I've come to take you out.

(bird calls)

- Lois sent you, didn't she?

- She thought you might be seedy when she got your letter to them.

- My letter to them?

- You did write to them, didn't you, saying you were ill or something?

- You mean she read my letter?

My letter to H.J.?

- I find...

don't you, that married people often have rather strange relationships?

One thinks they're on the point of breaking up,

and then it turns out they're thicker than ever.

Of course, you'd know better than I do,

being married yourself.

Lois...

...is a very rare person.

I'm very, very fond of her.

If I were to tell you everything she's been through with him...

I don't know why she puts up with him, really. Do you?

But that's the sort of person she is.

(clucking tongue) Come on.

Really, don't you think...

Honestly, don't you think women are truly superior beings?

I only have to think of my own parents.

Father - very charming and all that,

but weak, shiftless.

Oh, we children were on Mother's side. Absolutely.

I suppose that's made me the way I am.

I can't bear to see a woman taken advantage of,

whether it's you or Lois or... whoever.

What a beast.

She's most extraordinarily fond of you.

She thinks about you,

wants to help you.

Ah. Really fears... for you sometimes.

But I told her that basically you're quite a sensible sort of person.

You wouldn't ever do anything silly.

- So Lois has sent you to make sure I don't kill myself,

like the other girl. (laughing)

- You mustn't get hysterical.

You really mustn't.

(creaking)

(gong ringing)

(dissonant music)

(up-tempo music)

- I didn't like those dark circles around your eyes. (background chatter)

I hope you haven't been overdoing anything.

- She was singing an English parody!

- ...French are like sometimes. - I hate people who try

to get by with nothing but their sensitivity.

- Your sensitivity, what is it?

Clergymen's daughters with long, slim fingers and no money.

- Don't worry. They're getting killed off slowly.

- I say, a riddle.

Why is love like Rasputin?

- Why do you want money? - Stephan is coming out next week.

- If you go back to your husband,

I can't see you again. You understand that?

- Are you going to try and stop me, you and your damned Lois?!

- What... what's the matter?

- She's getting worked up again. Her husband's coming out.

Your husband will be expelled from France.

He'll go to Brussels and then to Amsterdam, from pillar to post.

Then he'll try and get back to Paris, where they'll arrest him again.

Now, is that the sort of life you want to share with him?

- And what sort of life do you think

I'm going to share with you and her?!

- I'm not going to have my party spoiled.

- Were you trying to borrow money from him?

- Why don't you give it to me? You should want to.

- Well, H.J. calls the shots, you know.

- Why is love... like Rasputin?

Why is love... like Rasputin?

- I haven't the faintest idea.

- Because... you can...

...poison it...

and you can...

stab it!

And you can...

knock it down in the mud...

...'cause it was always get up again.

- Ha!

- Well, don't you think that's good?

Don't you think that's funny?

Love will not die.

It simply will not die.

Just like Rasputin.

(birdsong)

- Why is your hair so long?

- The barber there always lets people grow it before they come out.

Decent of him.

A lot of the wardens are quite decent types.

They do their work.

I expect they'd prefer to do something else.

Now what do you wish?

An éclair?

Choux à la crème?

Meringue? The ones you like!

- But I can't eat all those cakes.

- But you must. Mado, you don't look well.

You haven't been eating properly.

You haven't been taking care of yourself.

Now, come on.

I'll be able to stay four days in Paris.

A type I left Fresnes with this morning may be able to lend me some money.

Bernadet. Marcel Bernadet.

Lives with a girl in Montmartre.

She was there to see him this morning.

A bit cold it seems, but she's a good girl.

Huh. She was so pleased to see him, she cried.

Ah.

The folly of that man is women, you know.

You've got some cream on your lip.

I don't blame you.

- Will you just be kind to me for a little?

- A year in jail doesn't make a man appetizing, huh?

(background chatter)

- That'll be Schlamovitz arguing with his lady friend.

Still, it's nice of him to let me stay here.

He was in there with me. Came out two weeks ago.

Pierre.

Pity.

Transparent soaps.

Skin food.

A very good business.

- I know a type who makes a fortune every three years in the Argentine.

Then he comes to Paris to spend it, the fool.

My God. Paris.

- Yes.

Provided you turn your back on the towns and go right out in the country.

- But you can't ride. - I can always learn.

- Yes.

In charge of accounts. (woman laughing)

- Do you think you could get a job like that?

- I need a haircut.

- I met her one night at the Moulin de la Galette.

She had nowhere to go, so I brought her home.

(man shouting)

- Hmm. You have very nice, soft hair, monsieur.

I'm glad you don't use pomade. Not like that one.

Makes you sick, so much pomade.

- If I tell you he has to leave Paris as quickly as possible, I say it for his sake.

A man thinks: I'm quite safe;

nobody's bothering about me.

He goes out and someone who knows him sees him on the boulevard...

- You've been very kind to him, Mr. Schlamovitz.

Thank you.

We worked together in the library there.

They have some very fascinating books.

You would be surprised. One can get an education

- I had a friend who went to Berlin when he came out.

He did very well there.

- I was thinking more of Amsterdam.

- Well, Amsterdam can be nice, too.

- I thought you were so enchanted with Paris.

- Well, every place can be nice with a nice friend.

(lively music playing)

- They are late.

Are we sure we want to do this?

My poor H.J..

- I thought we decided that we were going to see it through.

- Don't let's go. - But they're waiting for us.

I don't care. I want to be able to think your friends.

- I don't want to see them.

I don't want them to see you.

- Naturally not.

- It's they who are not good enough.

- Stephan...

...wherever you're going, don't go without me.

- I only have just enough for my own fare.

- I'll borrow some money from the Heidlers, and then I can go with you.

Why not? Why not?

- I must get away.

I've lost my luck.

- We always said we'd be together when you came out.

- You don't come out. Nobody ever comes out.

- For godsake, ask the waiter for another fine. I'm so thirsty.

- Don't have brandy, Mado. She oughtn't to drink brandy.

- I'm afraid you must come. - You're coming back with us, aren't you?

We'll drop you off at your hotel.

- You're very kind monsieur. I'll take her home.

- No, no, no, I think she should come with us. It's all on the way.

- Let's dance.

- You've done so much for my wife, madame.

You are very kind.

There's nothing I can to thank you.

- But you don't need me to tell you

that she's a very highly strung girl.

There have been difficulties.

One has had to protect her, rather.

- Against whom? - Against herself, principally.

We've seen too many girls left alone to drift around Paris.

- Yes. People take advantage of them.

- So it all comes down to a question of money.

I might've known with you!

- Do look at H.J. He can't dance and he hates it.

I don't know why he's doing it with her.

Do you?

- I expect you can tell me.

Don't forget... I've been away.

- I'm the last person to be able to forget that,

Monsieur... Zelli.

Let's just sit here and wait for them, shall we?

- You've made a mistake, madame. I'm not the type to sit and wait.

- I've had to long enough.

- I've never shared a woman in my life,

and now to have to share her with someone like that.

He smells of jail.

- Oh, you disgust me.

- I have a horror of you.

When I think of you, I feel sick!

(Marya laughing)

- Don't let her stew up our game.

- What is it that you want of me?

I told you I have to leave Paris very soon.

- Take her with you.

Don't you see what will happen?

- That's between the three of you.

- She is your wife.

- I carry very little when I travel.

- That must be very convenient, but not everyone can do it.

Some of us have to put up with things.

- Well, I wouldn't.

I'm used to living in a decent way among decent people.

- You know the conditions.

- As if I could... leave him that way.

- It's all so abominably sordid.

And pitiful.

Pitiful.

- You should stay with Lois.

Just be with her.

She's your sort.

- Don't you think I long to? So that I can be rid of you once and for all.

And let you stay with your sort, your convict husband.

(exclaiming) (murmurings)

Ah.

Don't you think it's time we rejoined our companions?

He went off, did he?

- He went off.

- Thank God.

(background chatter)

- Are you going alone?

I've had enough, too!

Up to here!

- So now we know.

- You've got to take me away with you.

Away from them.

Please help me.

- You must think I'm Jesus Christ.

So all the time you came to visit me in jail, you were Heidler's mistress.

You just came to laugh at me, well put away behind the bars.

- Don't leave me, Stephan.

You're all I have.

Please.

Help me.

(Stephan muttering)

- Tell me...

when you were living in the hotel...

Heidler came to visit you.

When did he come? Huh? Often?

(sniffling) - No!

I don't remember. It doesn't matter!!

- It doesn't matter.

You're funny, you.

You have a special way of looking at things.

- He said he had a horror of me.

And when he thought of me, he felt sick.

Be kind to me, Stephan.

Be good to me.

Because I'm unhappy that I think I'm going to die of it.

- Unhappy? Of course you're unhappy.

Can't you see that this man, who is at the end of his love,

this bag of bluff,

he just wants you as a sort of dessert to finish off his meal?

My poor Mado.

Poor Mado.

- No, don't touch me. Don't kiss me.

That isn't what I want. - Then what is it you want?

Alright, I'll help you.

Only, do this. Send a pneumati to Heidler, tell him to come here.

Say you have to speak to him urgently. Go on, do it now.

- And then? - Then I'll be waiting for him.

- You must be mad. - He's made a fool of you. He forgot me when he did that.

I'll be waiting for him.

I'll jump on him from behind the door and break his back!

- You are mad! - Go on, send a pneumatique.

I'll come with you.

- No! - You poor thing, you.

What fools women are.

And it isn't only that they are beasts and traitors,

but they are such fools!

Well, stay here and weep. I'll go and find Heidler myself.

Look here. You see this?

You thought I was well put away behind the bars.

Wait a bit. Let me pass.

- No! - Let me pass!

- No! you think I'd let you touch him?! I love him. I love him!

You think I care for you? Not this much!

It's him. I love him! Heidler!

- Will you get away from that door?

- You shan't go! If you go, I'll call the police!

I'll go straight to the police station and give you up!!

No!

- Ah! (sniffling)

- Take me with you. - No, I don't want anyone. I'm late. Please leave me alone.

- Take me with you. - I don't have any money. - Well, I have some.

- I'm going to miss my train. Please.

- I know a little hotel in Amsterdam where we can stay. Come. Hurry up.

- Stephan!!!

- Never mind, mademoiselle.

There are hundreds like them.

I must explain to you, mademoiselle...

...that I am an old-fashioned sort of person.

You can call me conservative or traditionalist if you like,

but I believe in the family.

Parents and grandparents,

grandchildren, children.

Nowadays... people live in a dirty way.

There's no tradition.

There's nothing beautiful.

The Description of Quartet