Practice English Speaking&Listening with: Lorenzo Colitti discusses Google's IPv6 deployment

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It's another way of reaching Google services...

...and if we can serve our users better over IPv6 than we can over IPv4, then we will do it.

We think that the demand for IP addresses will be in large user networks...

...and we are committed to good user experiences...

...and IPv6 will give us that when IPv4 addresses run out...

...so the first goal is to get IPv6 working on the front-end so that the users can connect to it.

The most important step in some way was the first step of launching...

...a public service that was available over IPv6.

And that was the day in March that we launched ipv6.google.com.

Because the first service launch you don't know how much traffic there's going to be...

...there's no precedent for it, you're starting something new...

...and you don't necessarily know how it's going to go.

And after that, a service already existed, and it was only a question of scaling it up.

At the moment, www.google.com is only available to users...

...of our Google Over IPv6 program, over IPv6.

As regards everybody in the world being able to connect to www.google.com over IPv6...

...the issue is that we know that certain networks and certain devices that are in the network...

...at the moment fail in the presence of IPv6, they fail...

...so it's usually closed to users that don't necessarily know how to fix it.

The user won't know that his ADSL modem is dropping his IPv6 packets and black-holing...

...he will just see that Google is slow or that the Internet is slow.

So that's why we have to be cautious...

...because the broken-ness damages the people that are not able to fix it easily.

But at the moment we're catering to early adopters...

...and trying to gain operational and trying to help other people gain operational experience...

... by doing Google Over IPv6.

feedback

Most of them say that nobody notices, which is of course the goal here.

We want it to be seamless and transparent, and if it works properly, that's the way it is.

Some of them have said that their performance is slightly better...

...especially in the case where their production IPv4 links are congested...

...and they can use parallel infrastructure or new infrastructure to do IPv6.

Some of them have said, 'thank you...

...now that you provide a large volume of traffic and a place to go...

...and users will notice immediately if there's some small connectivity problem...

...in our IPv6 network and it will get fixed'.

So the feedback has been very positive...

...nobody has ever asked to be removed from the white list...

...nobody has ever asked for Google Over IPv6 to be disabled for them.

deployment

The real impetus came when there was traction internally...

...to deploy a pilot network that was something that developers could actually use.

And when developers saw that there was a network, then the coding effort really started.

We basically went from zero to being able to serve most Google services over IPv6...

...to users that had good connectivity in a year and a half.

So lots of progress can be made because it's not a huge undertaking.

It's something that requires a lot of pieces in a lot of different places...

...in the infrastructure to come together, but it can be done...

...with not too many resources in a reasonably short time.

planning

Every time I designed something that looked different somehow...

...between the IPv4 and IPv6 versions, that turned out to have problems in the end.

The best way to proceed in general, or at least as far as I've seen...

...is to run everything on the same infrastructure.

That way it scales by itself, it's maintained by the usual people that maintain everything.

If it's similar to the existing infrastructure, your NOC personnel...

...will not have to be extensively trained because they'll just look at the configuration...

...they will look at the devices, and they will know what to do by themselves.

When you have the ability to do the work yourself, and do it on a volunteer basis...

...it's really much easier, so that's why I say to other companies...

...other network operators that are attempting to implement IPv6...

...one of the best things that you can do is tap the enthusiasm...

...that no doubt exists within your company.

Look at the people who might be willing to do this...

...who might be excited about doing IPv6 and just let them do their thing and they'll surprise you.

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