Practice English Speaking&Listening with: Marie Kondo | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up | Talks at Google

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[APPLAUSE]

MARIE KONDO: Hello, everybody.

My name is Marie Kondo.

Call me KonMari.

KonMari.

Yes.

I am a Japanese organizing consultant.

I usually visit client home and give her one-to-one organizing

lesson.

[SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So first of all, let

me start how I usually work with my clients.

So this is the first example.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So she is-- the lady

who lives in this room-- she is in her 20s.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: You already see in this picture

that she has full of stuff from her bed.

Actually, that's actually her bed, but you might not see it.

And she also had a lot of stuff on the floor.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: And she first told me

that, don't you think the bedroom is just like a storage?

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So when she comes home after work, she never,

ever feels relaxed in her room.

MARIE KONDO: But how about after my lesson?

Voila.

It looks so neat and clean.

Of course, nothing is on the floor.

[SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So my job is to consult how to organize,

and I've been doing this job for more than 10 years.

MARIE KONDO: Characteristics of my consultation

is thus-- my clients never go back to the mess

because they have been transformed to the organized

person.

Today, I'm going to tell you how to make

your house ordered in a way that will change your life forever.

[SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So before I start telling you what to do,

let me tell you how I start my job, how

I discovered this method.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: I was only five years

old when I got very interested in how to organize things.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So I was always picking up

every single issue of the magazine that my mother was

subscribing, and the magazine was about how

to organize the house.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So when I turned 15 years old,

I started a serious consultation to how to organize things.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: There was a best-selling book

in Japan titled "Technique to Get Rid of Things,"

and I read that book.

And I discovered the method.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So you would probably

wonder how I started researching organizing things.

First, I started reading every single book published in Japan

on organizing.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: And I also keep organizing things.

I worked every single day organizing things.

MARIE KONDO: Today, my own room.

Next day, my brother's room.

Next next day, my sister's room followed by the kitchen,

living room, bathroom, my friend's room, friend's room,

friend's room, my classroom, classroom,

classroom of the school.

And again, get down to my own room.

[SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So I spent most of my teenage years

organizing things just like that.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: And I started an organizing consultation

business when I was 19.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: I also picked this topic in my thesis at college.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE] So it's

safe to assume that I am a crazy, tidying fanatic.

[SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So you are perfect to think

that I'm a fanatic organizer at this point.

MARIE KONDO: Yes.

[SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So I'd like to present

KonMari method, which I discovered,

to everybody here today.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So let me start.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So number one of KonMari method.

MARIE KONDO: Tidy in one shot as quickly

and completely as possible.

[SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: If you think you have to tidy around

you everyday, gradually, little by little,

that's completely wrong.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Because you need a shock that changes your mind

into tidying your things.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So you want to finish it

in a very short period of time.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So the first important thing

is to set the deadline of organizing.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Of course, you can set the deadline in one

week, assuming that you're going to do that every day,

or you decide to do every weekend

and set the deadline in three months.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE] Special event nowadays.

INTERPRETER: So don't think about tidying

is an everyday event.

It's a special event, just like a festival.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So the number two item in KonMari method

is how you're going to do it.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE] Sort

by category, not by location.

[SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: It's very common to make this mistake

if you try to organize things in a specific location.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: It never ends if you

try to tidy up in just one portion of the closet

or one portion of the living room.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: The right way to do it is to organize by category

and do it quickly.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Well, for example, if you

decide to organize your clothes first,

take out all the clothes in your house in one spot.

Make a big pile of all the clothes you have in your house.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So just in the same way,

if you decide to organize your books,

take out all your books from your bookcase

and pile them up in one location in the house.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: I know it looks hard.

It's really messy.

I'll tell you why you need to do this.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: If you bring out all your stuff, books, clothes,

in one location, you visually realize

how much books, how many clothes you have.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: In daily life, we rarely understand how much

stuff we have around us.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So it is a great opportunity

if you bring out everything in one spot, realize

how much stuff you have, how many books you have,

so that you can decide which one you want to keep,

which one you really need to keep,

and which one you can get rid of.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So from this point, the next step you have to take

is to sort them or separate them between the things you need

and the things you don't.

And the criteria I recommend in my method

is a little bit unique.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: That's number three of KonMari method.

MARIE KONDO: Selection criterion-- does it spark joy?

[SPEAKING JAPANESE] spark joy.

This.

INTERPRETER: So does it spark joy?

This is the key word.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: I know I definitely feel weird air in this room

right now.

MARIE KONDO: Don't worry.

I'm used to this reaction from the audience.

INTERPRETER: So this is a really common reaction in my seminar.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So what I mean by saying,

spark joy-- I can explain exactly what it is.

So if you look at one thing, you should question yourself

if that thing makes you happy.

Does it make you impressed?

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Many people always think first which

one to get rid of, but it is much more important

to think which one to keep, which one

you want to keep and live together from now on.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So I will tell you how to make a decision.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So point number one, make sure you touch it.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Take every single item

you can think of in your hand.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: And imagine how your body reacts

to that moment, how you feel when you touch the item.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE] Spark joy.

INTERPRETER: So spark joy, this is the reaction

from your body, the reaction you feel from your body

when you touch the item you should keep.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Just like that.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So if you feel every single part of your body

faces up when you touch the item, that's the right feeling.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So on the other hand,

if the item doesn't give you any inspiration,

for example, this one.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: You started feeling down.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Your whole body started feeling down.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: I know you are skeptical,

but if you really try to do this,

you realize how your body really reacts.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Definitely after this seminar, when you go home

tonight, try part of it.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So let me go over my three basic methods--

do it quickly in a short amount of time, and sort by category,

and find if the item sparks joy.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE] "Life-Changing Magic of Tidying

Up." [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So this is my book, and if you

need to know more about it, if you'd

like to know more about it, please pick up this book.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So I definitely want every one of you

to read my book, but I will give you one more technique.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So this is the right order of organizing.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: There is definitely the right order

when you organize stuff, and this is how it goes.

Start from clothes, books, documents, miscellaneous items,

then mementos.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Make sure you follow this order.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: It often happens when

you are going through old photos, or mementos,

the items you were given from a mother,

it always stops you from organizing.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: That's why I definitely

recommend you this order because this order gives you

the sense of spark joy feeling.

You definitely learn that feeling with your body.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So in this order, while you start with clothes,

your body and your mind get trained with spark joy feeling.

And by the time you reach to mementos,

you're already good at how to do it.

You already know how to go through mementos.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: I'd like you to try my method with this order,

hopefully, tonight.

MARIE KONDO: This KonMari method always works.

I hope you would really try it.

[SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So I explain all my method to you by now,

so I would like to open the floor for a Q&A session.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Should we sit in the chairs?

MALE SPEAKER: Yeah.

So there's two mics.

There's one mic over there, and there's one mic over there

if you'd like to line up.

I'll get it started just because I'm right here.

So I wanted to know, how do you deal with somebody

who has a child, like a one-year-old child,

and there's toys everywhere?

INTERPRETER: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Well, this is not difficult.

It depends on the child's age, but I

have two different methods depending on the child's age.

The borderline is about three years old.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Because if the child

is younger than three years old, most of the cases,

parents just organize their stuff.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: But if the child is older than three years old,

it's time to train them how to organize things,

and they're capable of it.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: And the important thing at this point is

do not tell them to organize the toys.

Tell them to organize the clothes.

That's important.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Well, I'll tell you why.

Because clothing is something you always put on every day,

so if you learn how to fold the clothes that you always put

on and put it back into the clothing at the right spot,

that's the best way that they learn they need to organize

and the importance of organizing things.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So number one key is to teach them

how to fold the clothes.

MALE SPEAKER: OK.

Next question.

AUDIENCE: So I understand your method

in terms of getting yourself into a mindset where you only

have to do this once.

But I was curious how you deal with things that we acquire,

either things that we acquire ourselves

or things like gifts that come into the house.

Do you do an inventory annually?

Or do you just not let them come into house?

INTERPRETER: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: In her case, she doesn't really

have any rules for that.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Because her method is completely based on

if you were impressed, if you get inspired by the item.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Because it depends on the person

how often you want to organize or how much stuff you

need to keep around yourself.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Because my method, again and again,

is based on if you get inspired, if you get that spark joy

feeling, that doesn't really bring you back

to the crowded situation.

It's not really depending on how often you should acquire

or how you get the stuff in your room.

MARIE KONDO: Yes.

AUDIENCE: Thank you.

MALE SPEAKER: Next question.

MARIE KONDO: Next question.

AUDIENCE: Hi.

Thank you so much for coming.

The question is, I have a lot of things that I need,

but I don't like or they don't inspire joy.

How do I find the balance between keeping

versus discarding them?

INTERPRETER: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: For example, what kind of item?

AUDIENCE: GMAT study books and like very old kitchen utensils

that I haven't replaced.

INTERPRETER: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: If you judge those items are necessary for you

right now, that means those items are making you happy.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So even if you're not inspired by those items,

but if they are necessary to you right now,

you should keep them.

AUDIENCE: OK.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So one recommendation

I can give you is that if the item doesn't inspire

you, if you don't get the special feeling,

try to talk it into it.

Try to convince yourself that this is a good thing,

this is a good thing for you.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: If you keep doing it,

even if the item doesn't inspire you,

you start getting a positive feeling about it.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So in this way, you'll

probably find all the items you have in your house inspiring.

AUDIENCE: I see.

Thank you.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

MALE SPEAKER: Next question.

AUDIENCE: Have you ever encountered

in some of your clients-- my question is basically

about shared spaces.

If you are sharing a living room or the kitchen with somebody,

maybe you want to keep it clean or the things that

are important for you are not that many,

but the things that are important to the other person

are the most of them.

And they're just all over the place.

So is there like a way to make it work,

so you just have your space?

How does this--

INTERPRETER: Can you speak up?

I'm sorry.

I didn't catch the whole question.

AUDIENCE: I'm just curious about how to deal with a case

when most of the stuff actually does not belong to you,

so it's not your decision to keep it.

INTERPRETER: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So those are belonging

to someone else, correct?

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: You should prioritize

to organize your own items before you start

thinking about someone else.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: From my experience in the past 10 plus

years of my career, I've definitely

seen several clients who keep saying that,

oh, I tried to tidy up my room, but my husband

doesn't cooperate.

My kids don't really corporate.

But if you look at clients saying something like that,

they are the ones who are not tidying up correctly.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So this is true.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: I know you have to organize stuff no matter

what, so the important thing is you organize your stuff

and put them in your space.

So separate the space with other people.

So you take care of your stuff in your space

and leave the other stuff and other spaces

to the other people.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: And you shouldn't worry

about the space allocated to other people

because that's up to them.

That's their own business how to use them, how to organize them.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Of course, you can set a few rules like anything

shouldn't leak out or anything should be exposed,

stuff like that.

But that's the best way to do with other people.

AUDIENCE: Thank you.

MARIE KONDO: Thank you.

[SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Good luck.

AUDIENCE: Hi.

Thank you for coming.

Since you talk here about how to initially purge

the items you have, just sorting into what to keep and not,

do you also have recommendations for then

how you go about organizing the items that you decide to keep?

Or do you leave that up to the individual person?

INTERPRETER: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Yes, there is a clear rule.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So make sure to organize items

in the same category in the same spot.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: I often see at people's houses

the items in the same category here and there.

They're kind of scattered around.

So my point is to put all of them together in one spot.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So as I showed you earlier, organizing by category

is very important.

And another important thing I can definitely tell you

is how to fold the clothes.

That's definitely a big key.

AUDIENCE: Great.

Thank you.

MARIE KONDO: Thank you.

AUDIENCE: Hi.

Thanks for coming here.

And thanks for taking the time to write the book.

I have a friend who is a pretty serious hoarder

with a lot of stuff.

And when you ask him, do you need this stuff,

can you throw this stuff away?

The answer is, oh, I might need it later

or I have this grand plan to use this in such a way.

But of course, that never happens, and stuff just

keeps accumulating.

I wonder if you have worked with clients like that,

and what you say to them, and what the outcome is.

INTERPRETER: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Probably you're asking me the advice

to somebody who don't even bother organizing.

AUDIENCE: No, actually it's pretty organized.

He can find things.

It's just a huge amount of stuff that--

INTERPRETER: Oh, so it's not cluttered,

but he has a lot of items.

AUDIENCE: It is a lot of items, and it's

kind of creeping into the corridor space and so on.

You can't walk around in the house.

You know?

INTERPRETER: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: If he is my client, I

don't think it's important for me if he has too many items

or not.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: I think it is much, much

more important to figure out if that person is

happy with that amount of items.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So I would probably recommend that person

to imagine the ideal lifestyle for that person.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: I think your friend needs to figure out

what kind of lifestyle he or she wants,

what's the realistic life your friend wants so that he

or she can figure out how much stuff to keep

or what to keep, what not to keep, et cetera.

And this is a very efficient way of mindset for anybody.

If you have somebody like that in your family members,

friends around you, this is really highly recommended.

AUDIENCE: OK.

Thank you.

MALE SPEAKER: So we have time for one more question.

Those of you that were lucky enough to get here early

and got a book, Marie will sign them in the back afterwards.

INTERPRETER: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

AUDIENCE: Yeah.

My question is related to something that as engineers we

think sometimes a bit too much, how frequently we

should run a task.

Like should we run it in an [? online ?],

think about it running all the time.

Or should we run it in a batch?

So what do you think about organizing?

What's the ideal frequency that you'd advise?

Like should we think always be running in our mind?

Oh, I just picked a pen.

It's probably not that useful anymore.

So should we always be thinking about it?

Or should do it something-- at the extreme end

would be like once in a year, which is what I do typically

at the end of the year in December, I think,

all right, this is a bag for Goodwill.

This is a bag to throw.

And that's like the minimum we do, so when should we do that?

Should we do it at the end of the year?

Should we do this every end of the day?

Or should be constantly be thinking

about every time we encounter and thinking at the house

or at workplace?

INTERPRETER: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Well, the only answer is just do it one time.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Talking about when you should do,

my answer is right now.

It can be any time, but do it now.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Well, the reason is it's not

for tidying up your house, tidying up your living space.

It's all about how you want to spend the rest of your life

from now on.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So I highly recommend you

to do it right now, ASAP.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Good luck.

MALE SPEAKER: OK.

Any closing comments?

Or anything else that Marie wants to say?

INTERPRETER: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: I know the topic is kind of puzzling.

It's very unusual, but as a conclusion,

I would like to tell you why.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So I know every one of us has so many items.

There are so many items in our life.

But figuring out what items you have right now

is figuring out how you are going to live your life.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So my method is telling you to examine

every single item in your life.

That means you examine, you assess

your lifestyle and the life you want to live from now on.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So once you find out the inspiration

from every item you have, you probably learn the inspiration

on how you want to live, how you want

to work, how you want to be succeed,

how you want to make friendships, et cetera.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: So find out your own inspiration point

with items and with your lifestyle.

MARIE KONDO: [SPEAKING JAPANESE]

INTERPRETER: Thank you for listening to the KonMari

method.

And please, please, touch each item you have,

and feel the inspiration from them.

MARIE KONDO: Thank you very much today.

[APPLAUSE]

The Description of Marie Kondo | The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up | Talks at Google